Browse Definitions :

Printers

Terms related to printers, including definitions about scanners and words and phrases about inkjet, laser, photo and all-in-one printers.

3-D - XER

  • 3-D printing (additive manufacturing) - 3-D printing is a manufacturing process that builds layers to create a three-dimensional solid object from a digital model.
  • 3-D scanner - A 3-D scanner is an imaging device that collects distance point measurements from a real-world object and translates them into a virtual 3-D object.
  • aliasing - In sound and image generation, aliasing is the generation of a false (alias) frequency along with the correct one when doing frequency sampling.
  • Apple AirPrint - Apple AirPrint is an iOS feature that lets users print documents and other files from their iPhones and iPads.
  • Apple Bonjour - Apple Bonjour is a group of networking technologies designed to help devices and applications discover each other on the same network.
  • barcode printer - A barcode printer is a printer designed to produce barcode labels which can be attached to other objects.
  • calibration - In information technology and other fields, calibration is the setting or correcting of a measuring device or base level, usually by adjusting it to match or conform to a dependably known and unvarying measure.
  • Centronics parallel interface - The Centronics parallel interface is an older and still widely-used standard I/O interface for connecting printers and certain other devices to computers.
  • cloud printing - Cloud printing is a service that lets users print from any device on a network.
  • coldset Web offset printing (non-heatset) - Coldset Web offset printing (also known as non-heatset) is a Web offset printing process in which ink is allowed to dry naturally through evaporation and absorption.
  • commodity hardware - Commodity hardware, in an IT context, is a device or device component that is relatively inexpensive, widely available and more or less interchangeable with other hardware of its type.
  • digital printing - Digital printing describes the process of transferring a document on a personal computer or other digital storage device to a printing substrate by means of a device that accepts text and graphic output.
  • DOT4 - DOT4 is a protocol that allows a device that is part of a multifunction peripheral (MFP) to send and receive multiple data packets simultaneously across a single physical channel to other devices on the MFP.
  • dots per inch (dpi) - In computers, dots per inch (dpi) is a measure of the sharpness (that is, the density of illuminated points) on a display screen.
  • driver - A driver is a program that interacts with a particular device or special (frequently optional) kind of software.
  • electronic publishing on demand (EPOD) - Electronic publishing on demand (EPOD) is the use of a digital printer to create a book.
  • EMF (Enhanced MetaFile) - EMF (Enhanced MetaFile) and raw are terms for spool file formats used in printing by the Windows operating system.
  • EPP/ECP (Enhanced Parallel Port/Enhanced Capability Port) - EPP/ECP (Enhanced Parallel Port/Enhanced Capability Port) is a standard signaling method for bi-directional parallel communication between a computer and peripheral devices that offers the potential for much higher rates of data transfer than the original parallel signaling methods.
  • flexography (surface printing) - Flexography, sometimes referred to as "surface printing," is a method commonly used for printing on packaging and other uneven surfaces.
  • Google Cloud Print - Google Cloud Print is an online service that lets users print documents and other files from supported apps and mobile devices to any compatible printer.
  • grayscale - Grayscale is a range of shades of gray without apparent color.
  • hard copy (printout) - A hard copy (or "hardcopy") is a printed copy of information from a computer.
  • heat bed - A heat bed is an additional module for a 3D printer that makes the cooling process of 3D printed materials more controlled, for better results.
  • imagesetter - An imagesetter is a high resolution output device that can transfer electronic text and graphics directly to film, plates, or photo-sensitive paper.
  • inkjet printer - An inkjet printer is a computer peripheral that produces hard copy by spraying ink onto paper.
  • landscape - In printing from a computer, landscape refers to a mode in which content is printed for reading on the longer length of the sheet of paper.
  • laser printer - A laser printer is a popular type of personal computer printer that uses a non-impact (keys don't strike the paper), photocopier technology.
  • letterpress - Letterpress is the oldest form of printing.
  • LPT (line print terminal) - LPT (line print terminal) is the usual designation for a parallel port connection to a printer or other device on a personal computer.
  • mobile printing - Mobile printing is the process of sending data to a printer wirelessly from a smartphone or tablet.
  • multifunction peripheral (MFP) - A multifunction peripheral (MFP) is a device that performs a variety of functions that would otherwise be carried out by separate peripheral devices.
  • offset printing (offset lithography) - Offset printing, also called offset lithography, is a method of mass-production printing in which the images on metal plates are transferred (offset) to rubber blankets or rollers and then to the print media.
  • page description language (PDL) - A page description language (PDL) specifies the arrangement of a printed page through commands from a computer that the printer carries out.
  • PARC (Palo Alto Research Center) - PARC is Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center, located in Palo Alto, California, in the high-tech area that has become known as Silicon Valley.
  • photocopier - A photocopier is an electronic machine that makes copies of images and documents.
  • plotter - A plotter is a printer that interprets commands from a computer to make line drawings on paper with one or more automated pens.
  • port replicator - A port replicator is an attachment for a notebook computer that allows a number of devices such as a printer, large monitor, and keyboard to be simultaneously connected.
  • Portable Document Format (PDF) - PDF is also an abbreviation for the Netware Printer Definition File.
  • portrait - In computer printing, portrait is a mode in which the printer orients content for reading across the shorter length (the width) of the sheet of paper.
  • Postscript - Postscript is a programming language that describes the appearance of a printed page.
  • PPD file (Postscript Printer Description file) - A PPD (Postscript Printer Description) file is a file that describes the font s, paper sizes, resolution, and other capabilities that are standard for a particular Postscript printer.
  • PPM (pages per minute) - In printing, PPM is an abbreviation that stands for "pages per minute.
  • print bed - A print bed is the surface on a 3D printer where a print head lays down the materials that make up a 3D print.
  • print server - A print server is a software application, network device or computer that manages print requests and makes printer queue status information available to end users and network administrators.
  • printer - A printer is a device that accepts text and graphic output from a computer and transfers the information to paper, usually to standard-size, 8.
  • Printer Control Language (PCL) - Printer Control Language (PCL) is a language (essentially, a set of command code s) that enables applications to control HP DeskJet, LaserJet, and other HP printers.
  • printer pool - Printer pooling is a standard feature of Windows NT, 2000, XP, Vista and Windows 7 that allows agroup of printers to share the same name and function as if they were one printer.
  • rafts, skirts and brims - Rafts, skirts and brims are structures created at the base of the bottom of a 3D print.
  • scanner - A scanner is a device that captures images from photographic prints, posters, magazine pages, and similar sources for computer editing and display.
  • screen printing (serigraphy) - Screen printing, also known as serigraphy, is a method of creating an image on paper, fabric or some other object by pressing ink through a screen with areas blocked off by a stencil.
  • sheet-fed offset printing - Sheet-fed offset printing is a method in which individual pages of paper are fed into the machine.
  • soft copy - A soft copy (sometimes spelled "softcopy") is an electronic copy of some type of data, such as a file viewed on a computer's display or transmitted as an e-mail attachment.
  • spool (simultaneous peripheral operations online) - To spool (which stands for "simultaneous peripheral operations online") a computer document or task list (or "job") is to read it in and store it, usually on a hard disk or larger storage medium so that it can be printed or otherwise processed at a more convenient time (for example, when a printer is finished printing its current document).
  • substrate - A substrate is a solid substance or medium to which another substance is applied and to which that second substance adheres.
  • thermal transfer printer - A thermal transfer printer is a non-impact printer that uses heat to register an impression on paper.
  • thermography - Thermography is a printing or imaging method.
  • Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) - Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a standard that uses Internet and Web protocols to enable devices such as PCs, peripherals, intelligent appliances, and wireless devices to be plugged into a network and automatically know about each other.
  • USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) - USB 3.0, also known as SuperSpeed USB, is the next major revision of the Universal Serial Bus (USB).
  • web offset printing - Web offset is a form of offset printing in which a continuous roll of paper is fed through the printing press.
  • xerography (electrophotography) - Xerography, also known as electrophotography, is a printing and photocopying technique that works on the basis of electrostatic charges.
  • Xerox - Xerox is a provider of document-related technology and services.
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