Browse Definitions :

Programming

Definitions related to software programming, including tech terms about programming languages and words and phrases about software design, coding, testing and debugging.

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  • design reuse - In information technology, design reuse is the inclusion of previously designed components (blocks of logic or data) in software and hardware.
  • destructive testing - Destructive testing is a software assessment method used to find points of failure in a program.
  • development environment - In computer program and software product development, the development environment is the set of processes and programming tools used to create the program or software product.
  • deviceCOM - DeviceCOM, from Intrinsyc Software, is a line of device and network integration products that is used to make Internet or PC devices work with each other on a network.
  • DevOps - In its most broad meaning, DevOps is an operational philosophy that promotes better communication between development and operations as more elements of operations become programmable.
  • Digital Mars D - Digital Mars D is a programming language developed by Walter Bright of Digital Mars as an improvement to C++.
  • disassemble - In programming terminology, to disassemble is to convert a program in its executable (ready-to-run) form (sometimes called object code) into a representation in some form of assembler language so that it is readable by a human.
  • discoverability - Discoverability is the capacity of something to be found.
  • Diskpart (Disk Partition Utility) - Diskpart is a command-line utility used to manipulate disk partitions in all versions of Windows and Windows Server beginning with Windows XP and Windows Server 2003.
  • distributed computing - In general, distributed computing is any computing that involves programs with components shared among multiple computers.
  • distribution - In marketing, distribution is the process of moving a product from its manufacturing source to its customers.
  • DNN Platform (DotNetNuke) - DNN Platform, formerly called DotNetNuke Community Edition, is a free, open source content management system (CMS).
  • Document Object Model (DOM) - Document Object Model (DOM), a programming interface specification being developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), lets a programmer create and modify HTML pages and XML documents as full-fledged program objects.
  • domain model - In agile software development, a domain model describes the application domain responsible for creating a shared language between business and IT.
  • domain specific language (DSL) - A domain specific language (DSL) is a programming language developed to address an aspect within a specific domain.
  • driver development kit (DDK) - A driver development kit (DDK) is a set of programs and related files that are used to develop a new software or hardware driver or to update an existing legacy application driver for an operating system.
  • Drizzle - Drizzle is a lightweight open source database management system in development based on MySQL 6.
  • DRY principle - The DRY (don't repeat yourself) principle is a best practice in software development that recommends software engineers to do something once, and only once.
  • dynalink - Dynalink, a contraction for " dynamic link library " (DLL), is a term used in some Microsoft Windows error messages.
  • dynamic HTML - Dynamic HTML is a collective term for a combination of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) tags and options that can make Web pages more animated and interactive than previous versions of HTML.
  • dynamic link library (DLL) - A dynamic link library (DLL) is a collection of small programs that can be loaded when needed by larger programs and used at the same time.
  • dynamic memory allocation (in virtualization) - Dynamic memory allocation is a memory management technique in which a program can request and return memory while it is executing.
  • dynamic SQL (Dynamic Structured Query Language) - Dynamic SQL is an enhanced form of Structured Query Language (SQL) that, unlike standard (or static) SQL, facilitates the automatic generation and execution of program statements.
  • dynamic testing - Dynamic testing is a method of assessing the feasibility of a software program by giving input and examining output (I/O).
  • dynamic URL - A dynamic URL is the address - or Uniform Resource Locator (URL) - of a Web page with content that depends on variable parameters that are provided to the server that delivers it.
  • e-speak - E-speak is an open software platform designed by HP to facilitate the delivery of e-services (electronic services) over the Internet.
  • E. F. Codd (Edgar F. "Ted" Codd) - E. F.
  • Easter Egg - An Easter Egg is an unexpected surprise -- an undocumented procedure or unauthorized feature that's playful in nature or gives credit to the software developer or chip designer.
  • ebXML (electronic business xml) - ebXML (Electronic Business XML) is a project to use the Extensible Markup Language (XML) to standardize the secure exchange of business data.
  • ECC (error correction code or error checking and correcting) - ECC (either "error correction [or correcting] code" or "error checking and correcting") allows data that is being read or transmitted to be checked for errors and, when necessary, corrected on the fly.
  • Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation) - Eclipse is an open-source Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE) known for its plug-ins that allow developers to develop and test code written in other programming languages.
  • Eiffel - Eiffel is an object-oriented programming language developed by Bertrand Meyer, owner of Interactive Software Engineering (ISE), and named after Gustave Eiffel, the engineer who designed the Eiffel Tower.
  • elegant solution - The word elegant, in general, is an adjective meaning of fine quality.
  • Elk Cloner - Elk Cloner was the first computer virus known to have spread in the wild.
  • Emacs - Emacs (pronounced EE-maks and sometimes spelled "emacs" or "EMACS") is a popular text editor used mainly on Unix-based systems by programmers, scientists, engineers, students, and system administrators.
  • embedded software - Hardware makers use embedded software to control the functions of various hardware devices and systems.
  • embedded system - An embedded system is a combination of computer hardware and software, either fixed in capability or programmable, designed for a specific function or functions within a larger system.
  • embedded systems programming - Embedded systems programming is the programming of an embedded system in some device using the permitted programming interfaces provided by that system.
  • EmbeddedJava - EmbeddedJava is Sun Microsystems' software development platform for dedicated-purpose devices with embedded systems, such as products designed for the automotive, telecommunication, and industrial device markets.
  • encapsulation - In general, encapsulation is the inclusion of one thing within another thing so that the included thing is not apparent.
  • encapsulation in Java - Java offers four different "scope" realms--public, protected, private, and package--that can be used to selectively hide data constructs.
  • enclave - In IBM's OS/390 operating system, an enclave is a representation of a business transaction or unit of work.
  • encoding and decoding - Encoding is the process of putting a sequence of characters (letters, numbers, punctuation, and certain symbols) into a specialized digital format for efficient transmission or transfer.
  • engine - In computer programming, an engine is a program that performs a core or essential function for other programs.
  • enhancement - In an information technology product, an enhancement is a noteworthy improvement to the product as part of a new version of it.
  • Enlightenment (E) - Enlightenment, also called E, is a popular free and open source (FOSS) windows manager that can serve as a standalone desktop environment.
  • Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) - Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) is an architecture for setting up program components, written in the Java programming language, that run in the server parts of a computer network that uses the client/server model.
  • Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) - An enterprise service bus (ESB) is a middleware tool used to distribute work among connected components of an application.
  • entity relationship diagram (ERD) - An entity relationship diagram (ERD), also known as an entity relationship model, is a graphical representation of an information system that depicts the relationships among people, objects, places, concepts or events within that system.
  • entity-relationship model (ERM or ER model) - The entity-relationship model (or ER model) is a way of graphically representing the logical relationships of entities (or objects) in order to create a database.
  • environment variable - An environment variable defines some aspect of a user's or a program's environment that can vary.
  • Erlang programming language - Erlang is a programming language designed for developing robust systems of programs that can be distributed among different computers in a network.
  • ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data) - In personal computers with Windows, ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data) is data that provides a computer's BIOS and the operating system with information for communicating with plug and play (PnP) devices.
  • event - An event, in a computing context, is an action or occurrence that can be identified by a program and has significance for system hardware or software.
  • event handler - An event handler is a callback routine that operates asynchronously and handles inputs received into a program.
  • event handling - Event handling is the receipt of an event at some event handler from an event producer and subsequent processes.
  • event stream processing (ESP) - Event stream processing (ESP) is a software capacity designed to support implementation of event-driven architectures.
  • event-driven computing - Event-driven computing is a computing model in which programs perform work in response to identifiable occurrences that have significance for system hardware or software.
  • evolutionary robotics - Evolutionary robotics is a computer-simulated method of creating intelligent, autonomous robots with particular traits, based on the principles of Darwin's theory of evolution.
  • exception - An exception, in programming, is an unplanned event, such as invalid input or a loss of connectivity, that occurs while a program is executing and disrupts the flow of its instructions.
  • exception handler - In Java, checked exceptions are found when the code is compiled; for the most part, the program should be able to recover from these.
  • executable - In computers, to execute a program is to run the program in the computer, and, by implication, to start it to run.
  • exit program - In computer programming, an exit program (or exit routine) is a named unit of programming code that is entered when a particular condition occurs, such as one that requires some screening for authorization.
  • exploratory model - The exploratory model is a systems development method (SDM) occasionally used to design and develop a computer system or product and basically consists of planning and trying different designs until one of them seems to be the right one to develop.
  • exploratory testing - Exploratory testing is an approach to software assessment that integrates learning about the program with designing the test and conducting the testing processes.
  • extensible - In information technology, extensible describes something, such as a program, programming language, or protocol, that is designed so that users or developers can expand or add to its capabilities.
  • extract, transform, load (ETL) - In managing databases, extract, transform, load (ETL) refers to three separate functions combined into a single programming tool.
  • Extreme Programming (XP) - Extreme Programming (XP) is a pragmatic approach to program development that emphasizes business results first and takes an incremental, get-something-started approach to building the product, using continual testing and revision.
  • Fast Infoset (FI) - Fast Infoset (FI) is a standard that can serve as an alternative to XML (Extensible Markup Language) document formatting.
  • FastCGI - FastCGI is a programming interface that can speed up Web applications that use the most popular way to have the Web server call an application, the common gateway interface (CGI).
  • fatal exception - In a computer error message, a fatal exception indicates an exceptional situation requiring that the program responsible for the situation be closed.
  • feature creep - Feature creep (sometimes known as requirements creep or scope creep) is a tendency for product or project requirements to increase during development beyond those originally foreseen, leading to features that weren't originally planned and resulting risk to product quality or schedule.
  • Fennec - Fennec is a version of the Firefox browser adapted for mobile phones and other small computing devices.
  • FIFO (first-in, first-out) - In computer programming, FIFO (first-in, first-out) is an approach to handling program work requests from queues or stacks so that the oldest request is handled next.
  • file format - In a computer, a file format is the layout of a file in terms of how the data within the file is organized.
  • filter - In computer programming, a filter is a program or section of code that is designed to examine each input or output request for certain qualifying criteria and then process or forward it accordingly.
  • Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM) - Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM), formerly called Google Cloud Messaging (GCM), is a free cloud service from Google that allows app developers to send notifications and messages to users across a variety of platforms, including Android, iOS and web applications.
  • firefighting - Firefighting is an emergency allocation of resources, required to deal with an unforeseen problem.
  • Firefox 3 (Fx3 or FF3) - Firefox 3 (Fx3 or FF3) is the third version of the popular Web browser released by the Mozilla Corporation.
  • fist to five (fist of five) - Fist to five, also called fist of five, is a technique used by agile software development teams to poll team members and help achieve consensus.
  • flag - In programming, a flag is a predefined bitor bit sequence that holds a binary value.
  • Flash - Flash, a popular authoring software developed by Macromedia, is used to create vector graphics-based animation programs with full-screen navigation interfaces, graphic illustrations, and simple interactivity in an antialiased, resizable file format that is small enough to stream across a normal modem connection.
  • flowchart - A flowchart is a formalized graphic representation of a logic sequence, work or manufacturing process, organization chart, or similar formalized structure.
  • foo (in software programming) - Foo is a term used by developers as a placeholder when describing an idea or concept.
  • Forth - Forth is a high-level programming language that works like reverse Polish notation (RPN) on a calculator.
  • FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslation) - FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslation) is a third-generation (3GL) programming language that was designed for use by engineers, mathematicians, and other users and creators of scientific algorithms.
  • Fortress - Fortress is a programming language developed for high-performance computing (HPC) that can also serve as a general-purpose programming language.
  • framework - In computer systems, a framework is often a layered structure indicating what kind of programs can or should be built and how they would interrelate.
  • Free and open source software (FOSS) or free/libre open source software (FLOSS) - Free and open source software (FOSS), also known as free/libre open source software (FLOSS) and free/open source software (F/OSS), is software developed by informal collaborative networks of programmers and end users.
  • free software - Free software is software that can be freely used, modified, and redistributed with only one restriction: any redistributed version of the software must be distributed with the original terms of free use, modification, and distribution (known as copyleft).
  • FreeBSD - FreeBSD is a popular free and open source operating system that is based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) version of the Unix operating system.
  • full-stack developer - A full-stack developer is a type of programmer that has a functional knowledge of all techniques, languages and systems engineering concepts required in software development.
  • functional programming - Functional programming is a style of programming that emphasizes the evaluation of expressions rather than the execution of commands.
  • functional specification - A functional specification (or sometimes functional specifications) is a formal document used to describe in detail for software developers a product's intended capabilities, appearance, and interactions with users.
  • fuzzy logic - Fuzzy logic is an attempt to use more human-like reasoning and better reflect reality through employing"degrees of truth" rather than the usual "true or false" (1 or 0) Boolean logic on which the modern computer is based.
  • fuzzy search - A fuzzy search is a process that locates Web pages that are likely to be relevant to a search argument even when the argument does not exactly correspond to the desired information.
  • G-code - G-code (also known as RS-274) is the name of the most prevalent programming language for computer numerical control (CNC) in computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM).
  • Gantt chart - A Gantt chart is a horizontal bar chart developed as a production control tool in 1917 by Henry L.
  • garbage collection - Garbage collection is the systematic recovery of pooled computer storage that is being used by a program when that program no longer needs the storage.
  • garbage in, garbage out (GIGO) - GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) is a concise expression of a concept common to computer science and mathematics: the quality of output is determined by the quality of the input.

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