Browse Definitions :

Programming

Definitions related to software programming, including tech terms about programming languages and words and phrases about software design, coding, testing and debugging.

JOB - PER

  • job - In certain computer operating systems, a job is the unit of work that a computer operator gives to the operating system.
  • job scheduler - A job scheduler is a program that enables an enterprise to schedule and, in some cases, monitor computer 'batch' jobs (units of work, such as the running of a payroll program).
  • John von Neumann - John von Neumann was the scientist who conceived a fundamental idea that serves all modern computers - that a computer's program and the data that it processes do not have to be fed into the computer while it is working, but can be kept in the computer's memory - a notion generally referred to as the stored-program computer.
  • JOLAP (Java Online Analytical Processing) - JOLAP (Java Online Analytical Processing) is a Java application-programming interface (API) for the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) environment that supports the creation, storage, access, and management of data in an online analytical processing (OLAP) application.
  • JRun - JRun is an application server from Macromedia that is based on Sun Microsystems' Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE).
  • JSON (Javascript Object Notation) - JSON (JS Object Notation) is a text-based, human-readable data interchange format used for representing simple data structures and objects in Web browser-based code.
  • JTAPI (Java Telephony Application Programming Interface) - JTAPI (Java Telephony Application Programming Interface) is a Java-based application programming interface (API) for computer telephony applications.
  • just-in-time compiler (JIT) - A just-in-time (JIT) compiler is a program that turns bytecode into instructions that can be sent directly to a computer's processor (CPU).
  • Jython - Jython is an open source implementation of the Python programming language, integrated with the Java platform.
  • Kaizen (continuous improvement) - Kaizen is an approach to creating continuous improvement based on the idea that small, ongoing positive changes can reap significant improvements.
  • Karnaugh map (K-map) - A Karnaugh map (K-map) is a pictorial method used to minimize Boolean expressions without having to use Boolean algebra theorems and equation manipulations.
  • Kebab case - Kebab case -- or kebab-case -- is a programming variable naming convention where a developer replaces the spaces between words with a dash.
  • key-value pair (KVP) - A key-value pair (KVP) is a set of two linked data items: a key, which is a unique identifier for some item of data, and the value, which is either the data that is identified or a pointer to the location of that data.
  • Keyhole Markup Language (KML) - Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML-based markup language designed to annotate and overlay visualizations on various two-dimensional, Web-based online maps or three-dimensional Earth browsers (such as Google Earth).
  • KLOC (thousands of lines of code) - KLOC (thousands of lines of code) is a traditional measure of how large a computer program is or how long or how many people it will take to write it.
  • knowledge engineering - Knowledge engineering is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) that tries to emulate the judgment and behavior of a human expert in a given field.
  • Kotlin - Kotlin is a static type, object-oriented programing (OOP) language that is interoperable with the Java virtual machine, Java libraries and Android.
  • LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - LAMP is an open source Web development platform that uses Linux as the operating system, Apache as the Web server, MySQL as the relational database management system and PHP as the object-oriented scripting language.
  • Language Workbench - A Language Workbench (LWB) is a development toolset that facilitates the development and editing of domain specific languages (DSLs).
  • language-oriented programming (LOP) - Language-oriented programming (LOP) is an approach to software development that focuses on the use of domain specific languages (DSLs) to solve problems within various domains in a system or application.
  • layer - In computer programming, layering is the organization of programming into separate functional components that interact in some sequential and hierarchical way, with each layer usually having an interface only to the layer above it and the layer below it.
  • lazy loading (dynamic function loading) - Lazy loading, also known as dynamic function loading, is a mode that allows a developer to specify what components of a program should not be loaded into storage by default when a program is started.
  • Lean software development - Lean software development is a concept that emphasizes optimizing efficiency and minimizing waste in the development of software.
  • lexical scoping (static scoping) - Lexical scoping (sometimes known as static scoping) is a convention used with many programming languages that sets the scope (range of functionality) of a variable so that it may only be called (referenced) from within the block of code in which it is defined.
  • lightweight - In information technology, the term lightweight is sometimes applied to a program, protocol, device, or anything that is relatively simpler or faster or that has fewer parts than something else.
  • LINQ (Language Integrated Query) - LINQ (Language Integrated Query) is a Microsoft programming model and methodology that essentially adds formal query capabilities into Microsoft .
  • LISP (list processing) - LISP, an acronym for list processing, is a programming language that was designed for easy manipulation of data strings.
  • living documentation - Living documentation is a dynamic method of system documentation that provides information that is current, accurate and easy to understand.
  • load testing - Load testing is the process of subjecting a computer, peripheral, server, network or application to a work level approaching the limits of its specifications.
  • logical AND symbol - For a practical application, see logic gate.
  • logical OR symbol - For a practical application, see logic gate.
  • loop - In computer programming, a loop is a sequence of instructions that is continually repeated until a certain condition is reached.
  • machine code (machine language) - Machine code, also known as machine language, is the elemental language of computers.
  • machine learning - Machine learning (ML) is a type of artificial intelligence (AI) that allows software applications to become more accurate at predicting outcomes without being explicitly programmed to do so.
  • macro - In Microsoft Word and other programs, a macro is a saved sequence of commands or keyboard strokes that can be stored and then recalled with a single command or keyboard stroke.
  • MapReduce - MapReduce is a core component of the Apache Hadoop software framework.
  • markup - Markup refers to the sequence of characters or other symbols that you insert at certain places in a text or word processing file to indicate how the file should look when it is printed or displayed or to describe the document's logical structure.
  • marshalling - Originally, to marshall was to tend horses or to arrange things in preparation for a feast.
  • massive open online course (MOOC) - A massive open online course (MOOC) is a free web-based distance learning program that is designed for large numbers of geographically dispersed students.
  • MATLAB - MATLAB is a fourth-generation programming language and numerical analysis environment used for matrix calculations, developing and running algorithms, creating user interfaces (UI) and data visualization as well as other functions.
  • MBean (managed bean) - In the Java programming language, an MBean (managed bean) is a Java object that represents a manageable resource, such as an application, a service, a component, or a device.
  • memory dump - A memory dump is the process of taking all information content in RAM and writing it to a storage drive.
  • memory management - Memory management is the process of controlling and coordinating computer memory, assigning portions called blocks to various running programs to optimize overall system performance.
  • message passing interface (MPI) - The message passing interface (MPI) is a standardized means of exchanging messages between multiple computers running a parallel program across distributed memory.
  • message queueing - In programming, message queueing is a method by which process (or program instances) can exchange or pass data using an interface to a system-managed queue of messages.
  • meta - Metadata is a description of data.
  • method - In object-oriented programming, a method is a programmed procedure that is defined as part of a class and included in any object of that class.
  • mickey - The mickey, in a computing context, is a unit for the smallest detectable movement of a mouse.
  • Micronaut framework - Micronaut is an open source JVM-based software framework for building lightweight, modular applications and microservices.
  • micropayment - A micropayment is an e-commerce transaction involving a very small sum of money in exchange for something made available online, such as an application download, a service or Web-based content.
  • microservice architecture (MSA) - A microservice architecture (MSA) is a logical structure for the design of a software program involving loosely-coupled modular components known as microservices.
  • Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC Library) - The Microsoft Foundation Class (MFC) Library is a collection of class es (generalized definitions used in object-oriented programming) that can be used in building application program s.
  • Microsoft Quantum Development Kit - The Microsoft Quantum Development Kit is a set of programming tools for writing code that will run on a quantum computer.
  • middleware - Middleware is software that is used to bridge the gap between applications and other tools or databases.
  • MIT License (X11 license or MIT X license) - The MIT License (also known as the X11 license or MITX license) is a software license that was originally developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • mnemonic - In general, a mnemonic (from Greek mnemon or mindful; pronounced neh-MAHN-ik) is a memory aid, such as an abbreviation, rhyme or mental image that helps to remember something.
  • mobile UI (mobile user interface) - A mobile UI is the user interface on a mobile device, usually including a touch screen display and all the other elements of the device that allow the user to interact with it.
  • model-view-controller (MVC) - In object-oriented programming development, model-view-controller (MVC) is the name of a methodology or design pattern for successfully and efficiently relating the user interface to underlying data models.
  • Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) - Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) is a software design pattern that is structured to separate program logic and user interface controls.
  • module - A module is a separate unit of software or hardware.
  • moniker - In general, a moniker is a name or a nickname and, in the simplest terms, that is what it is in computer terminology as well.
  • monolithic - Monolithic, in information technology, means either very large or composed all in one piece, depending on the particular context.
  • monolithic architecture - A monolithic architecture is the traditional unified model for the design of a software program.
  • Morphis - Morphis is a Java -based open source wireless transcoding platform from Kargo, Inc.
  • MPP (massively parallel processing) - MPP (massively parallel processing) is the coordinated processing of a program by multiple processors that work on different parts of the program, with each processor using its own operating system and memory.
  • multiprocessing - Multiprocessing is the coordinated processing of programs by more than one computer processor.
  • multithreading - It is easy to confuse multithreading with multitasking or multiprogramming, which are somewhat different ideas.
  • mutex (mutual exclusion object) - In computer programming, a mutex (mutual exclusion object) is a program object that is created so that multiple program thread can take turns sharing the same resource, such as access to a file.
  • native app - A native application is a software program that is developed for use on a particular platform or device.
  • natural language - In computing, natural language refers to a human language such as English, Russian, German, or Japanese as distinct from the typically artificial command or programming language with which one usually talks to a computer.
  • natural language processing (NLP) - Natural language processing (NLP) is the ability of a computer program to understand human language as it is spoken and written -- referred to as natural language.
  • nested - In general, something that is nested is fully contained within something else of the same kind.
  • NetBeans - NetBeans is a Java-based integrated development environment (IDE).
  • nil - In general use, nil (a contraction of Latin "nihil") means "nothing" or the absence of something.
  • no op (no operation) - A no op (or no-op), for no operation, is a computer instruction that takes up a small amount of space but specifies no operation.
  • no-code - No-code is a software development approach that requires few, if any, programming skills to quickly build an application.
  • Node.js - Node.js, often called simply "Node" in conversation, is a development platform built on top of Google's V8 JavaScript virtual machine.
  • obfuscation - Obfuscation means to make something difficult to understand.
  • object - In object-oriented programming (OOP), objects are the things you think about first in designing a program and they are also the units of code that are eventually derived from the process.
  • object code - Source code and object code refer to the "before" and "after" versions of a computer program that is compiled (see compiler) before it is ready to run in a computer.
  • object-oriented programming (OOP) - Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a computer programming model that organizes software design around data, or objects, rather than functions and logic.
  • object-relational mapping (ORM) - Object-relational mapping (ORM) is a mechanism that makes it possible to address, access and manipulate objects without having to consider how those objects relate to their data sources.
  • OCX - An OCX is an Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) custom control, a special-purpose program that can be created for use by applications running on Microsoft's Windows systems.
  • Open Document Format (ODF) - The Open Document Format (ODF) is an XML-based open source file format for saving and exchanging text, spreadsheets, charts, and presentations.
  • Open Source Hardening Project - The Open Source Hardening Project is an initiative of the United States Department of Homeland Security, created to improve the security of open source code.
  • open source hardware (open hardware) - Open source hardware, also called open hardware, is electronic or computer hardware built from design information that could be copyrighted or licensed but has instead been made available for public use at no charge.
  • OpenAPI Specification - The OpenAPI (OAI) Specification defines a standard, programming language-agnostic interface description for RESTful APIs.
  • operation - An operation, in mathematics and computer science, is an action that is carried out to accomplish a given task.
  • orthogonal - Orthogonal concepts have their roots in advanced mathematics.
  • out-of-order execution (OoOE) - Out-of-order execution (OoOE) is an approach to processing that allows instructions for high-performance microprocessors to begin execution as soon as their operands are ready.
  • pair programming - Pair programming is an Agile software development technique originating from Extreme programming (XP) in which two developers team together and work on one computer.
  • panel - In computer program development, a panel is a representation of what information will be sent to a user's display screen in given circumstances.
  • parallel processing - Parallel processing is a method in computing of running two or more processors (CPUs) to handle separate parts of an overall task.
  • parser - In computer technology, a parser is a program, usually part of a compiler, that receives input in the form of sequential source program instructions, interactive online commands, markup tags, or some other defined interface and breaks them up into parts (for example, the nouns (objects), verbs (methods), and their attributes or options) that can then be managed by other programming (for example, other components in a compiler).
  • Pascal - Pascal is a strongly-typed third-generation language (3GL) with a one-pass compiler.
  • Pascal case - Pascal case is a naming convention in which developers start each new word in a variable with an uppercase letter.
  • pastebin - A pastebin is a Web application that allows users to upload and share text online.
  • pattern (design pattern) - In software development, a pattern (or design pattern) is a written document that describes a general solution to a design problem that recurs repeatedly in many projects.
SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • Melissa virus

    Melissa was a type of email virus that initially become an issue in early 1999.

  • Twofish

    Twofish is a symmetric-key block cipher with a block size of 128 bits and variable-length key of size 128, 192 or 256 bits.

  • walled garden

    On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • hard disk drive (HDD)

    A computer hard disk drive (HDD) is a non-volatile data storage device.

  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

Close