Browse Definitions :

Programming

Definitions related to software programming, including tech terms about programming languages and words and phrases about software design, coding, testing and debugging.

PRO - SOF

  • problem management - Problem management, in information technology, is a process aimed at resolving incidents and problems caused by end-user errors or IT infrastructure issues, and preventing recurrence of such incidents.
  • problem program - Now seldom used, the term problem program is used to distinguish a computer program that directly supports a user application from an operating system, a utility, or any other underlying support programming.
  • product backlog grooming - Product backlog grooming is an Agile software development process in which the development team revisits a pre-defined product backlog, working with stakeholders to prioritize and break the backlog list into user stories for future use.
  • product owner - The product owner is a role in scrum development of the person who represents the business or user community.
  • product-agnostic - Product-agnostic is a description of something that is not associated with a particular commercial product -- such as a specific device or application -- or something that is interoperable with all products of a given type.
  • program counter - A program counter is a register in a computer processor that contains the address (location) of the instruction being executed at the current time.
  • program temporary fix (PTF) - In IBM, a program temporary fix (PTF) is a temporary solution to a bug in an IBM software product that is made available for customers to install.
  • Programmer's Day - Programmer's Day celebrates the contributions of programmers to humanity.
  • programming language generations - In the computer industry, these abbreviations are widely used to represent major steps or "generations" in the evolution of programming languages.
  • Programming Language/System (PL/S) - PL/S is a language that IBM designed for use in developing system programs, especially in mainframe operating system and application subsystems.
  • project management - Project management is the discipline of using established principles, procedures and policies to successfully guide a project from conception through completion.
  • project planning - Project planning is a discipline for stating how to complete a project within a certain timeframe, usually with defined stages, and with designated resources.
  • Project Tango - Project Tango is the former name for the Project Metro Web services initiative.
  • protected mode - Protected mode is a mode of program operation in a computer with an Intel-based microprocessor in which the program is restricted to addressing a specific contiguous area of 640 kilobytes.
  • prototype - In software development, a prototype is a rudimentary working model of a product or information system, usually built for demonstration purposes or as part of the development process.
  • pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) - A pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) is a program written for, and used in, probability and statistics applications when large quantities of random digits are needed.
  • pseudocode - Pseudocode (pronounced SOO-doh-kohd) is a detailed yet readable description of what a computer program or algorithm must do, expressed in a formally-styled natural language rather than in a programming language.
  • Python - Python is an interpreted, object-oriented programming language similar to PERL, that has gained popularity because of its clear syntax and readability.
  • Quagga - Quagga is an open source suite of applications for the management of routing protocols.
  • quality - In an information technology product or service, quality is sometimes defined as "meeting the requirements of the customer.
  • quality assurance (QA) - Quality assurance (QA) is any systematic process of determining whether a product or service meets specified requirements.
  • Quick Fix Engineering (QFE) - Quick Fix Engineering (QFE) is a Microsoft term for the delivery of individual service updates to its operating systems and application programs such as Word.
  • Quiz -- Software development - How to take the quiz: - After reading the question, click on the answer that you think is correct to go to the whatis.
  • race condition - A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at the same time, but because of the nature of the device or system, the operations must be done in the proper sequence to be done correctly.
  • random numbers - Random numbers are numbers that occur in a sequence such that two conditions are met: ( the values are uniformly distributed over a defined interval or set, and (2) it is impossible to predict future values based on past or present ones.
  • rapid application development (RAD) - Rapid application development (RAD) is a model based on the concept that higher-quality products can be developed faster through more expedient processes, such as early prototyping, reusing software components and less formality in team communications.
  • rapid mobile app development (RMAD) - Rapid mobile application development (RMAD) uses low-code/no-code programming tools to speed the process of application creation for mobile platforms.
  • Rational Rose - Rational Rose, is a object-oriented Unified Modeling Language (UML) software design tool intended for visual modeling and component construction of enterprise-level software applications.
  • Rational Unified Process (RUP) - Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an object-oriented and Web-enabled program development methodology.
  • reactive programming - Reactive programming describes a design paradigm that relies on asynchronous programming logic to handle real-time updates to otherwise static content.
  • recursion - In computer programming, a recursion (noun, pronounced ree-KUHR-zhion) is programming that is recursive (adjective), and recursive has two related meanings: A recursive procedure or routine is one that has the ability to call itself.
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) - Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is a distribution of the Linux operating system developed for the business market.
  • reentrant - Reentrant is an adjective that describes a computer program or routine that is written so that the same copy in memory can be shared by multiple users.
  • refactoring - Refactoring is "the process of changing a software system in such a way that it does not alter the external behavior of the code yet improves its internal structure," according to Martin Fowler, the "father" of refactoring.
  • refresh rate - The refresh rate is the number of times a display's image is repainted or refreshed per second.
  • register (processor register, CPU register) - A processor register is one of a small set of data holding places that are part of a processor, or CPU, in a computer.
  • regression testing - Regression testing is a type of software test that assesses if changes to an application, or other related software components, introduce defects.
  • regular expression (regex) - A regular expression (sometimes abbreviated to "regex") is a way for a computer user or programmer to express how a computer program should look for a specified pattern in text and then what the program is to do when each pattern match is found.
  • RELAX NG (RELAX Next Generation) - RELAX NG (RELAX Next Generation) is a deliberately simple and straightforward XML markup language for metadocument data, aka schemas, developed in response to the W3C XML Schema standard.
  • release - A release is the distribution of the final version of an application.
  • release management - Release management is a software engineering process intended to oversee the development, testing, deployment and support of software releases.
  • release plan - In agile software development, a release plan is an evolving flowchart that describes which features will be delivered in upcoming releases.
  • reliability - Reliability is an attribute of any computer-related component (software, or hardware, or a network, for example) that consistently performs according to its specifications.
  • Remote Method Invocation (RMI) - RMI (Remote Method Invocation) is a way that a programmer, using the Java programming language and development environment, can write object-oriented programming in which objects on different computers can interact in a distributed network.
  • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) - Remote Procedure Call (RPC) is a protocol that one program can use to request a service from a program located in another computer on a network without having to understand the network's details.
  • reparse point - A reparse point is an object in a file system with attributes that activate extended functionality.
  • Report Program Generator (RPG) - RPG (Report Program Generator) is a programming language that originated as a report-building program used in DEC and IBM minicomputer operating systems and evolved into a fully procedural programming language.
  • requirements stability index (RSI) - A requirement stability index (RSI) is a metric used to organize, control, and track changes to the originally specified requirements for a new system project or product.
  • rescoring - Rescoring is an Agile software development process in which the development team revisits a pre-defined list of user stories to review story point scores and adjust them up or down based on what the team has learned in previous development iterations.
  • reverse engineering - Reverse engineering is taking apart an object to see how it works in order to duplicate or enhance the object.
  • Rexx - Rexx is an interpreted script language developed by IBM originally for use by personal users of large operating systems.
  • RFM analysis (recency, frequency, monetary) - RFM (recency, frequency, monetary) analysis is a marketing technique used to determine which customers are the best ones by examining how often a customer buys (recency), how long it's been since their last purchase (frequency), and.
  • rollover - In creating page for a Web site, a rollover (some people call it a "mouseover") is a technique using JavaScript that lets you change a page element (usuallly a graphic image) when the user rolls the mouse over something on the page (like a line of text or a graphic image).
  • ROM emulation - ROM emulation is the process of copying data from a ROM (read-only memory) chip to a storage medium such as a hard disk or flash memory.
  • Rosetta - Rosetta is a translation program that makes it possible to run most PowerPC applications on Intel-based Macintosh computers as non-native binary code.
  • rounding error - Rounding error is the difference between a rounded-off numerical value and the actual value.
  • routine - In computer programming, routine and subroutine are general and nearly synonymous terms for any sequence of code that is intended to be called and used repeatedly during the executable of a program.
  • Ruby - Ruby is an open source, interpreted, object-oriented programming language created by Yukihiro Matsumoto, who chose the gemstone's name to suggest "a jewel of a language.
  • Rule of Least Power - The Rule of Least Power is the notion that a programmer should use the least powerful programming language required to code for a given requirement.
  • runtime - Runtime is when a program is running (or being executable).
  • sandbox (computer security) - A sandbox is an isolated testing environment that enables users to run programs or execute files without affecting the application, system or platform on which they run.
  • SAP BAPI (Business Application Programming Interface) - SAP BAPI (Business Application Programming Interface) is a standard interface to the business object models in SAP products.
  • SAP Basis - Basis is a set of middleware programs and tools from SAP, the German company whose comprehensive R/3 product is used to help manage large corporations.
  • SAP Exchange Infrastructure (SAP XI) - SAP Exchange Infrastructure (SAP XI) is SAP's enterprise application integration (EAI) software, a component of the NetWeaver product group used to facilitate the exchange of information among a company's internal software and systems and those of externa.
  • SAP Integration Adapter - A SAP Integration Adapter is a product that facilitates the integration of a business application into an environment running SAP applications with SAP's NetWeaver and the SAP Exchange Infrastructure.
  • SAP Integration Repository - SAP Integration Repository is the design configuration piece of the SAP Exchange Infrastructure (XI), the process integration layer of the NetWeaver component from SAP, the company that sells a widely-used enterprise application platform.
  • SAP Integration Server - SAP Integration Server is the central component of SAP XI (Exchange Infrastructure), the company's enterprise application integration (EAI) product.
  • SAP NetWeaver - SAP NetWeaver is a technology platform that allows organizations to integrate data, business processes, elements and more from a variety of sources into unified SAP environments.
  • SAX (Simple API for XML) - SAX (Simple API for XML) is an application program interface (API) that allows a programmer to interpret a Web file that uses the Extensible Markup Language (XML) -- that is, a Web file that describes a collection of data.
  • scalar - In mathematics, scalar (noun) and scalar (adjective) refer to a quantity consisting of a single real number used to measured magnitude (size).
  • scraper site - A scraper site is a website that features content stolen from other sites and presented as original.
  • Scratch - Scratch is a free object-oriented software development kit (SDK) that allows children age 8-16 to create animations, interactive stories, games and music without needing to know a specific programming language.
  • script - In computer programming, a script is a program or sequence of instructions that is interpreted or carried out by another program rather than by the computer processor (as a compiled program is).
  • scripting language - A scripting language is a form of programming language that is usually interpreted rather than compiled.
  • SDL (Specification and Description Language) - SDL (Specification and Description Language) is a program design and implementation language that is used to build real-time event-driven systems that involve parallel processing.
  • seamless interface - A seamless interface is the joining of two computer programs so that they appear to be one program with a single user interface.
  • Secure Shell Charter (SSH Charter) - The Secure Shell Charter (SSH Charter) is a set of papers produced by the Secure Shell Working Group (SSH Working Group), an organization dedicated to updating and standardizing the popular Unix-based interface and protocol known as Secure Shell (SSH or secsh).
  • security by design - Security by design is an approach to software and hardware development that seeks to make systems as free of vulnerabilities and impervious to attack as possible through such measures as continuous testing, authentication safeguards and adherence to best practices.
  • Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) - Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) is a formal way to specify Microsoft Windows security descriptors or text strings that describe who owns various objects such as files in the system.
  • seize - To seize is to take or wrest control of something that you did not previously control.
  • self-directed work team (SDWT) - A self-directed work team (SDWT) is a group of people, usually employees in a company, who combine different skills and talents to work without the usual managerial supervision toward a common purpose or goal.
  • semaphore - In programming, especially in Unix systems, semaphores are a technique for coordinating or synchronizing activities in which multiple processes compete for the same operating system resources.
  • semiotics - Semiotics is the study of the use of symbolic communication.
  • server virtualization - Server virtualization is the masking of server resources, including the number and identity of individual physical servers, processors, and operating systems, from server users.
  • Service Data Objects (SDO) - Service Data Objects (SDO) is the name of a specification designed to streamline the processing of SOA (service-oriented architecture) data from diverse sources such as XML documents, relational databases and Web services.
  • Service Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) - The Service Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) is a paradigm developed by IBM that defines the extent to which various services are integrated in a service-oriented architecture (SOA).
  • service pack - A service pack is an orderable or downloadable update to a customer's software that fixes existing problems and, in some cases, delivers product enhancements.
  • SFX (special effects) - SFX, an abbreviation for special effects, is a software product that makes it easy to create certain kinds of hypertext links within a collection of information such as the description of a library collection.
  • SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) - SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) is a standard for how to specify a document markup language or tag set.
  • shared memory - In computer programming, shared memory is a method by which program processes can exchange data more quickly than by reading and writing using the regular operating system services.
  • shared source - Shared source is a software licensing concept that is more open than the proprietary approach to licensing but more restricted than the open source model.
  • shotgun debugging - Shotgun debugging is the debugging of a program, hardware, or system problem using the approach of trying several possible solutions at the same time in the hope that one of them will work.
  • simplicity - In information technology, simplicity is a quality that is frequently sought by both users and technologists, although, as users frequently attest, it is not always found.
  • Simula (simulation language) - Simula, short for "simulation language," was the first object-oriented programming language.
  • Single UNIX Specification - The Single UNIX Specification is an industry standard description of the C language program and user command interfaces for a standard Unix operating system.
  • single-sourcing - Single-sourcing is the development of information content in a form that can conveniently be the basis for other forms of content.
  • single-system image (SSI) - Single-system image (SSI) is the idea that the resources provided by cluster computing or in any system which aggregates resources should present a single interface to the user.
  • singleton - In object-oriented programming, a singleton class is a class that can have only one object (an instance of the class) at a time.
  • site scraper - A site scraper is a type of software used to copy content from a website.
  • Slashdot - Slashdot is a socially curated website dedicated to technology-related news items.

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