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Programming

Definitions related to software programming, including tech terms about programming languages and words and phrases about software design, coding, testing and debugging.

VEE - ZEN

  • Veepers - Veepers is a product that is used to animate digital images of people (or other creatures) for video presentations in which the characters appear to talk.
  • versioning - Versioning is the creation and management of multiple releases of a product, all of which have the same general function but are improved, upgraded or customized.
  • virtual appliance - A virtual appliance is a virtual machine image file consisting of a pre-configured operating system environment and a single application.
  • Visual Basic (VB) - Visual Basic (VB) is an event-driven programming language and environment from Microsoft that provides a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows programmers to modify code by simply dragging and dropping objects and defining their behavior and appearance.
  • Visual Basic .NET (VB.NET or VB .NET) - Visual Basic .
  • Visual InterDev - Visual InterDev is Microsoft's development tool for building a dynamic, data-driven Web site.
  • Visual Studio .NET - Visual Studio .
  • Visual Studio Express (VSE) - Visual Studio Express (VSE) is a freeware version of Microsoft's Visual Studio development environment toolset.
  • VoiceXML - VoiceXML is an application of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) which, when combined with voice recognition technology, enables interactive access to the Web through the telephone or a voice-driven browser.
  • VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) - VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) is a language for describing three-dimensional (3-D) image sequences and possible user interactions to go with them.
  • W2K (Windows 2000) - Windows 2000 (W2K) is a est commercial version of Microsoft's evolving Windows operating system.
  • walking skeleton - A walking skeleton, in a software development context, is a minimal initial implementation of an application that includes and connects the major components of the system's architecture.
  • waterfall model - The waterfall model is a linear, sequential approach to the software development life cycle (SDLC) that is popular in software engineering and product development and emphasizes a logical progression of steps.
  • WAX (Wireless Abstract XML) - Wireless Abstract XML (WAX) is an abstract markup language and associated tools that facilitate wireless application development.
  • Web application (Web app) - A Web application (Web app) is an application program that is stored on a remote server and delivered over the Internet through a browser interface.
  • web application development - Web app development is the creation of application programs that reside on remote servers and are delivered to the user’s device over the Internet.
  • Web services - Web services are a type of internet software that use standardized messaging protocols and are made available from an application service provider’s web server for use by a client or other web-based programs.
  • Web stack - A Web stack is the collection of software required for Web development.
  • What is a neural network? Explanation and examples - In information technology, an artificial neural network is a system of hardware and/or software patterned after the operation of neurons in the human brain.
  • What is DevOps? The ultimate guide - The word 'DevOps' is a combination of the terms 'development' and 'operations,' meant to represent a collaborative or shared approach to the tasks performed by a company's application development and IT operations teams.
  • What is server virtualization? The ultimate guide - Server virtualization is a process that creates and abstracts multiple virtual instances on a single server.
  • widget - In general, widget (pronounced WID-jit) is a term used to refer to any discrete object, usually of some mechanical nature and relatively small size, when it doesn't have a name, when you can't remember the name, or when you're talking about a class of certain unknown objects in general.
  • wildcard character - A wildcard character is a special character that represents one or more other characters.
  • Windows 2000 - Windows 2000 (W2K) is a commercial version of Microsoft's evolving Windows operating system.
  • Wireless Markup Language (WML) - WML (Wireless Markup Language), formerly called HDML (Handheld Devices Markup Languages), is a language that allows the text portions of Web pages to be presented on cellular telephones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) via wireless access.
  • Wirth's Law - Wirth's Law states that computer software increases in complexity faster than does the ability of available hardware to run it.
  • word - In computer architecture, a word is a unit of data of a defined bitlength that can be addressed and moved between storageand the computer processor.
  • workaround - A workaround is a method, sometimes used temporarily, for achieving a task or goal when the usual or planned method isn't working.
  • Worse is Better - Worse is Better is a software design principle that states that software quality is not wholly dependent on the number features of functions and that less is often more.
  • worst-case execution time (WCET) - Worst-case execution time (WCET) is a software development metric that determines the maximum length of time a task or set of tasks requires on a specific hardware platform.
  • wrapper - In information technology, a wrapper is data that precedes or frames the main data or a program that sets up another program so that it can run successfully.
  • write once, run anywhere (WORA) - Write once, run anywhere (WORA) is a term that refers to a particular program's supposed ability to run on all common OSs (operating systems).
  • xenodochial - Xenodochial is an adjective describing something, such as a person, place, or software application, that is friendly to strangers.
  • XML pipeline - An XML pipeline is a formalized, logical expression of the method by which an XML (Extensible Markup Language) document is handled.
  • XQL (XML Query Language) - XQL (XML Query Language) is a way to locate and filter the elements (data fields) and text in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) document.
  • XQuery - XQuery is a specification for a query language that allows a user or programmer to extract information from an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file or any collection of data that can be XML-like.
  • XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) - XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language), formerly called Extensible Style Language, is a language for creating a style sheet that describes how data sent over the Web using the Extensible Markup Language (XML) is to be presented to the user.
  • YAGNI principle ("You Aren't Gonna Need It") - YAGNI principle ("You Aren't Gonna Need It") is a practice in software development which states that features should only be added when required.
  • yak shaving - Yak shaving is programming lingo for the seemingly endless series of small tasks that have to be completed before the next step in a project can move forward.
  • YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) - YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a data-oriented language structure used as the input format for diverse software applications.
  • Yoda conditions (Yoda notation) - Yoda conditions, also known as Yoda notation, is a programming variation that reverses the standard order of a conditional statement.
  • zenware - Zenware refers to application programs that function with a minimum of superfluous user intervention.
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • security token

    A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a ...

  • hardware security module (HSM)

    A hardware security module (HSM) is a physical device that provides extra security for sensitive data.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

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