Browse Definitions :

Programming

Definitions related to software programming, including tech terms about programming languages and words and phrases about software design, coding, testing and debugging.

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  • spaghetti code - Spaghetti code is a derogatory term for computer programming that is unnecessarily convoluted, and particularly programming code that uses frequent branching from one section of code to another.
  • spam filter - A spam filter is a program that is used to detect unsolicited and unwanted email and prevent those messages from getting to a user's inbox.
  • Speech Application Program Interface (SAPI) - SAPI (Speech Application Program Interface) is an application program interface (API) provided with the Microsoft Windows operating systemthat allows programmers to write programs that offer text-to-speech and speech recognitioncapabilities.
  • spike - A spike is a sharp rise in the frequency for a given variable, usually immediately followed by a decrease.
  • spiral model (spiral lifecycle model) - The spiral model, also known as the spiral lifecycle model, is a systems development method (SDM) used in information technology (IT).
  • SQL injection - SQL injection is a type of security exploit in which the attacker adds Structured Query Language (SQL) code to a Web form input box to gain access to resources or make changes to data.
  • SSADM (Structured Systems Analysis & Design Method) - SSADM (Structured Systems Analysis & Design Method) is a widely-used computer application development method in the UK, where its use is often specified as a requirement for government computing projects.
  • stack overflow - A stack overflow is an undesirable condition in which a particular computer program tries to use more memory space than the call stack has available.
  • stack pointer - A stack pointer is a small register that stores the address of the last program request in a stack.
  • stack smashing - Stack smashing is causing a stack in a computer application or operating system to overflow.
  • state diagram (state machine diagram or statechart diagram) - A state diagram, also known as a state machine diagram or statechart diagram, is an illustration of the states an object can attain as well as the transitions between those states in the Unified Modeling Language (UML).
  • state machine - In general, a state machine is any device that stores the status of something at a given time and can operate on input to change the status and/or cause an action or output to take place for any given change.
  • stateless - Stateful and stateless are adjectives that describe whether a computer or computer program is designed to note and remember one or more preceding events in a given sequence of interactions with a user, another computer or program, a device, or other outside element.
  • static testing - Static testing is a software testing method that involves examination of the program's code and its associated documentation but does not require the program be executed.
  • static verification - Static verification is the set of processes that analyzes code to ensure defined coding practices are being followed, without executing the application itself.
  • statistical mean, median, mode and range - Calculating the mean, median, mode and range of a set of numbers allows you to track changes over time and set acceptable ranges and variance.
  • stochastic - Generally, stochastic (pronounced stow-KAS-tik, from the Greek stochastikos, or "skilled at aiming," since stochos is a target) describes an approach to anything that is based on probability.
  • story - In agile software development, a story is a particular business need assigned to the software development team.
  • stove-piped development - In engineering and information technology, stove-piped development is an approach in which improvements are considered only within the existing and technologically familiar context.
  • straw man - In general, a straw man is an object, document, person, or argument that temporarily stands in for and is intended to be "knocked down" by something more substantial.
  • stress testing - Stress testing is the process of determining the ability of a computer, network, program or device to maintain a certain level of effectiveness under unfavorable conditions.
  • string - In programming, a string is a contiguous (see contiguity) sequence of symbols or values, such as a character string (a sequence of characters) or a binary digit string (a sequence of binary values).
  • strongly-typed programming language - A strongly-typed programming language is one in which each type of data (such as integer, character, hexadecimal, packed decimal, and so forth) is predefined as part of the programming language and all constants or variables defined for a given program must be described with one of the data types.
  • structured programming (modular programming) - Structured programming, sometimes known as modular programming, is a subset of procedural programming that enforces a logical structure on the program being written to make it more efficient and easier to understand and modify.
  • stub - A stub is a small program routine that substitutes for a longer program, possibly to be loaded later or that is located remotely.
  • Sun ONE (Sun Open Net Environment) - Sun ONE (Sun Open Net Environment) is a marketing strategy and set of products from Sun Microsystems aimed at enabling an enterprise to build Web services for its own internal use and for its customers.
  • supervisor call (SVC) - In computers, especially IBM mainframes, a supervisor call (SVC) is a processor instruction that directs the processor to pass control of the computer to the operating system's supervisor program.
  • Swing - Swing is a set of program components for Java programmers that provide the ability to create graphical user interface (GUI) components, such as buttons and scroll bars, that are independent of the windowing system for specific operating system.
  • SWiSH - SWiSH is a program that is used to create Flash animations without using Macromedia's Flash product.
  • synchronize-and-stabilize (sync-and-stabilize) - Synchronize-and-stabilize (sometimes just called sync-and-stabilize) is a systems development life cycle model in which teams work in parallel on individual application modules, frequently synchronizing their code with that of other teams, and debugging (stabilizing) code regularly throughout the development process.
  • syntax - Syntax is the grammar, structure, or order of the elements in a language statement.
  • systems development life cycle (SDLC) - The systems development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application.
  • Taco Bell programming - Taco Bell programming is an approach to software development that places value on consistently using the same development tools and languages when creating solutions for new problems.
  • tag - A tag is a generic term for a language element descriptor.
  • taskbar - In the graphical user interface (GUI) for a computer operating system or application, a taskbar is a visual device on the desktop that typically shows the user which applications (tasks) are currently active and running.
  • Tcl/Tk (Tool Command Language) - Tcl is an interpreted script language from Sun Microsystems and Tcl is companion program for creating a Tcl graphical user interface (GUI).
  • teach box - A teach box is a device that registers and memorizes mechanical motions or processes for later recall and execution by an electronic or computer system.
  • technical errata - Technical errata are the details of unintended faults in hardware and software components.
  • template - A template is a form, mold, or pattern used as a guide to making something.
  • test-driven development (TDD) - Test-driven development (TDD), also called test-driven design, is a method of implementing software programming that interlaces unit testing, programming and refactoring on source code.
  • thread - On the Internet in Usenet newsgroups and similar forums, a thread is a sequence of responses to an initial message posting.
  • thread-safe - In computer programming, thread-safe describes a program portion or routine that can be called from multiple programming threads without unwanted interaction between the threads.
  • thunk - Thunk is programming that converts 16-bit memory address space into 32-bit memory address space and vice versa.
  • tier - In general, a tier (pronounced TEE-er ; from the medieval French tire meaning rank, as in a line of soldiers) is a row or layer in a series of similarly arranged objects.
  • timebox - In agile software development, a timebox is a defined period of time during which a task must be accomplished.
  • timestamp - A timestamp is the current time of an event that is recorded by a computer.
  • Tool Command Language (Tcl) - Tool Command Language (Tcl) is an interpreted script language developed by Dr.
  • Tool Kit (Tk) - Tool Kit (Tk) is a companion program to Tool Command Language (Tcl) for creating graphical user interfaces.
  • Top searches of 2008 - What were people searching the WhatIs.
  • Total Quality Management (TQM) - Total Quality Management is a management framework based on the belief that an organization can build long-term success by having all its members, from low-level workers to its highest ranking executives, focus on quality improvement and, thus, delivering customer satisfaction.
  • transaction - In computer programming, a transaction usually means a sequence of information exchange and related work (such as database updating) that is treated as a unit for the purposes of satisfying a request and for ensuring database integrity.
  • transcoding - Transcoding is the ability to adapt digital files so that content can be viewed on different playback devices.
  • transparent - In computers, transparent means something a little different than its general meaning of having the quality of being easily seen through, coming closer to meaning invisible or undetectable.
  • trap - In a Web site, a trap is a page that does not allow the reader to back up a previous page (the Back button on the toolbar is inoperable).
  • truncate - To truncate is to shorten by cutting off.
  • truncation error - Truncation error is the difference between a truncated value and the actual value.
  • tuple - In programming languages, such as Lisp, Python, Linda, and others, a tuple (pronounced TUH-pul) is an ordered set of values.
  • UIML (User Interface Markup Language) - UIML (User Interface Markup Language) is a descriptive language that lets you create a Web page that can be sent to any kind of interface device - for example, to a PC with a large display and a keyboard or to a "smart phone" with a tiny display and no keyboard.
  • UML (Unified Modeling Language) - UML (Unified Modeling Language) is a standard notation for the modeling of real-world objects as a first step in developing an object-oriented design methodology.
  • Universal Business Language (UBL) - Universal Business Language (UBL) is a royalty-free set of documents based on the ebXML (Electronic Business XML) Core Components Technical Specification, also known as ISO 15000-5.
  • URL shortening - URL shortening is the translation of a long Uniform Resource Locator (URL) into an abbreviated alternative that redirects to the longer URL.
  • usability - Also see human-computer interaction and graphical user interface.
  • use case - A use case is a methodology used in system analysis to identify, clarify, and organize system requirements.
  • use case diagram (UML use case diagram) - A use case is a methodology used in system analysis to identify, clarify, and organize system requirements; a use case diagram is a graphic depiction of the interactions among the elements of a system.
  • user acceptance testing (UAT) - In software development, user acceptance testing (UAT) - also called beta testing, application testing, and end user testing - is a phase of software development in which the software is tested in the "real world" by the intended audience.
  • user exit - In computer software, a user exit is a place in a software program where a customer can arrange for their own tailor-made program to be called.
  • user interface (UI) - In information technology, the user interface (UI) is everything designed into an information device with which a person may interact.
  • UUCP (UNIX-to-UNIX Copy Protocol) - UUCP (UNIX-to-UNIX Copy Protocol) is a set of UNIX programs for copying (sending) files between different UNIX systems and for sending commands to be executed on another system.
  • variable - In programming, a variable is a value that can change, depending on conditions or on information passed to the program.
  • VBScript - VBScript is an interpreted script language from Microsoft that is a subset of its Visual Basic programming language designed for interpretation by Web browsers.
  • vector graphics rendering (VML) - Vector graphics rendering, sometimes abbreviated VML, refers to scalable vector graphics (SVG) used in Web pages.
  • Vector Markup Language (VML) - Vector Markup Language (VML) is an XML-based language that facilitates the use of vector graphics on the Internet, especially on Web sites.
  • vectored interrupt - In a computer, a vectored interrupt is an I/O interrupt that tells the part of the computer that handles I/O interrupts at the hardware level that a request for attention from an I/O device has been received and and also identifies the device that sent the request.
  • Veepers - Veepers is a product that is used to animate digital images of people (or other creatures) for video presentations in which the characters appear to talk.
  • versioning - Versioning is the creation and management of multiple releases of a product, all of which have the same general function but are improved, upgraded or customized.
  • vi - vi, pronounced by using each letter (vee-aye), is a widely-used and popular UNIX-based text editor.
  • virtual appliance - A virtual appliance is a virtual machine image file consisting of a pre-configured operating system environment and a single application.
  • virtual device driver - In certain Microsoft operating systems, a virtual device driver is a program that handles software interrupts from the operating system (rather than hardware interrupts) for each of the computer's main hardware devices, including the hard disk drive controller, keyboard, and serial and parallel ports.
  • Visual Basic (VB) - Visual Basic is a programming environment from Microsoft in which a programmer uses a graphical user interface to choose and modify preselected sections of code written in the BASIC programming language.
  • Visual Basic .NET (VB.NET or VB .NET) - Visual Basic .
  • Visual InterDev - Visual InterDev is Microsoft's development tool for building a dynamic, data-driven Web site.
  • Visual J# - Visual J# (sometimes known as just J#) is a set of programmming tools that allow developers to use the Java programming language to write applications that will run on Microsoft's .
  • Visual Studio .NET - Visual Studio .
  • Visual Studio Express (VSE) - Visual Studio Express (VSE) is a freeware version of Microsoft's Visual Studio development environment toolset.
  • Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) - Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) is an extension of the Microsoft Visual Studio architecture that allows it to encompass development teams, with special roles and tools for software architects, developer specialties and testers.
  • VoiceXML - VoiceXML is an application of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) which, when combined with voice recognition technology, enables interactive access to the Web through the telephone or a voice-driven browser.
  • VoxML (Voice Markup Language) - VoxML (Voice Markup Language) is a technology from Motorola for creating a voice dialog with a Web site in which a user can call a Web site by phone and interact with it through speech recognition and Web site responses.
  • VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) - VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) is a language for describing three-dimensional (3-D) image sequences and possible user interactions to go with them.
  • W2K (Windows 2000) - Windows 2000 (W2K) is a est commercial version of Microsoft's evolving Windows operating system.
  • walking skeleton - A walking skeleton, in a software development context, is a minimal initial implementation of an application that includes and connects the major components of the system's architecture.
  • waterfall model - The waterfall model is a linear, sequential approach to the software development life cycle (SDLC) that is popular in software engineering and product development and emphasizes a logical progression of steps.
  • WAX (Wireless Abstract XML) - Wireless Abstract XML (WAX) is an abstract markup language and associated tools that facilitate wireless application development.
  • Web application (Web app) - A Web application (Web app) is an application program that is stored on a remote server and delivered over the Internet through a browser interface.
  • web application development - Web app development is the creation of application programs that reside on remote servers and are delivered to the user’s device over the Internet.
  • Web Intermediaries (WBI) - Web Intermediaries (WBI - pronounced "webby") is a framework and set of programming tools from IBM for the uniform creation and control of intermediary programs such as proxy servers, transcoding processors, and any kind of program that sits somewhere between two end points in a network.
  • Web services - Web services are a type of internet software that use standardized messaging protocols and are made available from an application service provider’s web server for use by a client or other web-based programs.
  • Web stack - A Web stack is the collection of software required for Web development.
  • WebSphere Development Studio Client (WDSC) - WebSphere Development Studio Client (WDSC) is a set of application development tools designed for the IBM (International Business Machines) iSeries server.
  • widget - In general, widget (pronounced WID-jit) is a term used to refer to any discrete object, usually of some mechanical nature and relatively small size, when it doesn't have a name, when you can't remember the name, or when you're talking about a class of certain unknown objects in general.
  • wildcard character - A wildcard character is a special character that represents one or more other characters.

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