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Project management

Terms related to project management, including definitions about project management methodologies and tools.

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  • private sector - The private sector is the part of a country's economic system that is run by individuals and companies, rather than the government.
  • privilege bracketing - Privilege bracketing is the practice of limiting temporarily increased permission levels to the briefest possible time period.
  • process-centric BPM - Process-centric business process management is a holistic approach to BPM that centers on processes themselves, rather than individual  components such as  documents, workflow or people.
  • product lifecycle - The product lifecycle is the collective stages that a product goes through from its conception and design through to its ultimate disposal.
  • product lifecycle sustainability - Product lifecycle sustainability is an approach to managing the stages of a product’s existence so that any negative impact on the environment is minimized.
  • product owner - The product owner is a role in scrum development of the person who represents the business or user community.
  • professional emancipation - Professional emancipation is an approach to work that focuses on the ability of individuals to guide and control their careers and work life.
  • progressive delivery - Progressive delivery is the process of pushing changes to a product iteratively, first to a small audience and then to increasingly larger audiences to maintain quality control (QC).
  • project charter (PC) - A project charter (PC) is a document that states a project exists and provides the project manager with written authority to begin work.
  • project management - Project management is the discipline of using established principles, procedures and policies to successfully guide a project from conception through completion.
  • Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) - The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) is a document containing standard terminology, best practices and process guidelines around project management as defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI).
  • Project Management Professional (PMP) - Project Management Professional (PMP) certification is a qualification program overseen by the Project Management Institute (PMI).
  • project planning - Project planning is a discipline for stating how to complete a project within a certain timeframe, usually with defined stages, and with designated resources.
  • project post-mortem - Project post-mortem is a process intended to inform project improvements by determining aspects that were successful or unsuccessful.
  • project scope - Project scope is the part of project planning that involves determining and documenting a list of specific project goals, deliverables, tasks, costs and deadlines.
  • proprietary solution - A proprietary solution is a hardware or software product or combination of products and services that is tied to a specific vendor, to the exclusion of all other vendors.
  • public relations (PR) - Public relations (PR) is the use of communications to manage public perception of an individual or an organization.
  • quality control (QC) - Quality control (QC) is a procedure or set of procedures intended to ensure that a manufactured product or performed service adheres to a defined set of quality criteria or meets the requirements of the client or customer.
  • quality function deployment - Quality function deployment (QFD) is the translation of user requirements or requests into designs.
  • rainmaker (business) - A rainmaker is an individual who generates an unusually high amount of revenue for an organization by bringing new clients and new business to the company.
  • reality check - A reality check is a second opinion, either requested or provided voluntarily, about the status of some current situation.
  • red teaming - Red teaming is the practice of rigorously challenging an organization's plans, policies, systems and assumptions by applying an adversarial approach.
  • reinforcement theory - Reinforcement theory is a psychological principle maintaining that behaviors are shaped by their consequences and that, accordingly, individual behaviors can be changed through rewards and punishments.
  • release - A release is the distribution of the final version of an application.
  • release management - Release management is a software engineering process intended to oversee the development, testing, deployment and support of software releases.
  • release plan - In agile software development, a release plan is an evolving flowchart that describes which features will be delivered in upcoming releases.
  • relentless incrementalism - Relentless incrementalism is a process in which something substantial is built through the accumulation of small but incessant additions.
  • reorganization (reorg) - Reorganization, in a business context, is an overhaul of a company's internal structure.
  • repeatable process - A repeatable process is a set of actions that allow for a more efficient use of limited resources and reduce unwanted variation during the development and implementation of various projects.
  • requirements analysis (requirements engineering) - Requirements analysis, also called requirements engineering, is the process of determining user expectations for a new or modified product.
  • Respect for People principle - Continuous Improvement (CI) and Respect for People are the two foundational principles of the Toyota Way, the company's business management guide.
  • Results-Only Work Environment (ROWE) - A Results-Only Work Environment (ROWE) is a human resource management (HRM) strategy that places emphasis on setting and meeting objectives.
  • Ringelmann effect - The Ringelmann effect is a reduction in productivity per individual that tends to occur as the numbers of people involved in a work group increase.
  • risk-reward ratio - Risk-reward ratio is a formula used to measure the expected gains of a given investment against the risk of loss.
  • RS Means - RS Means is a division of Reed Business Information that provides cost information to the construction industry so contractors in the industry can provide accurate estimates and projections for their project costs.
  • rule of thumb - A rule of thumb is a principle that is intended to provide general guidance rather than precise direction.
  • satisficer - A satisficer is a pragmatic individual who makes decisions based on meeting requirements in a timely manner, finding the “good enough” solution and moving on.
  • scenario - Scenarios are potential events or combinations of events that could have an effect on a business -- typically a given scenario carries either risk or opportunity.
  • scenario planning - Scenario planning allows a business to prepare for various potential events and situations, known as scenarios.
  • seed capital - Seed capital is the funding required to get a new business started.
  • segregation of duties (SoD) - Segregation of duties (SoD) is an internal control designed to prevent error and fraud by ensuring that at least two individuals are responsible for the separate parts of any task.
  • Service Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) - The Service Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) is a paradigm developed by IBM that defines the extent to which various services are integrated in a service-oriented architecture (SOA).
  • should costing (should-cost analysis) - The purpose of should-cost analysis is assessing an appropriate figure to guide negotiations or to compare with a figure provided by a supplier.
  • SOA governance - SOA governance refers to the processes used to oversee and control the adoption and implementation of service-oriented architecture (SOA) in accordance with recognized practices, principles and government regulations.
  • social entrepreneur - A social entrepreneur is an individual who conceptualizes and spearheads business enterprises, such as startups, that are focused on providing service to the community more than financial gain.
  • social loafing - Social loafing is a reduction of individual effort that tends to occur when people work in groups.
  • social media manager - A social media manager is the individual in an organization trusted with monitoring, contributing to, filtering, measuring and otherwise guiding the social media presence of a brand, product, individual or corporation.
  • social proof - Social proof is a psychological phenomenon in which the actions and attitudes of the people around us (either in real life or online) are considered support to guide our own behavior.
  • social task management - Social task management (STM) is a real-time, collaborative software-based approach to business activities that have traditionally been conducted through sequential processes such as document sharing and status updates.
  • Socialcast - Socialcast is an enterprise social networking and collaboration platform by VMware.
  • Software Process Improvement and Capability dEtermination (SPICE) - SPICE (Software Process Improvement and Capability dEtermination) is an international framework for assessment of software processes developed jointly by the ISO and the IEC.
  • software requirements specification (SRS) - A software requirements specification (SRS) is a comprehensive description of the intended purpose and environment for software under development.
  • spaghetti diagram - A spaghetti diagram is a graphic representation of the flow of some entity, such as a person, a product or a piece of information, as it goes through some process.
  • spike - A spike is a sharp rise in the frequency for a given variable, usually immediately followed by a decrease.
  • SRI International (SRI) - SRI International (SRI), founded as Stanford Research Institute International, is an independent, non-profit research institute headquartered in Menlo Park, California.
  • stand-up - In agile software development, a stand-up is a daily progress meeting, traditionally held within a development area.
  • Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) - The Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC), originally known as the System Performance Evaluation Cooperative, is a consortium of leading computer hardware and software manufacturers that was founded in 1988 with the goal of defining, establishing, maintaining and endorsing benchmarks applicable to computer systems.
  • startup accelerator - A startup accelerator, sometimes referred to as a seed accelerator, is a business program that supports early-stage, growth-driven companies through education, mentorship and financing.
  • startup company - A startup company is a newly formed business with particular momentum behind it based on perceived demand for its product or service.
  • state diagram (state machine diagram or statechart diagram) - A state diagram, also known as a state machine diagram or statechart diagram, is an illustration of the states an object can attain as well as the transitions between those states in the Unified Modeling Language (UML).
  • statistical process control (SPC) - Statistical process control (SPC) is a scientific, data-driven methodology for monitoring, controlling and improving procedures and products.
  • steering committee - A steering committee is a group of high-level advisors who have been appointed to provide an organization or project with direction.
  • story - In agile software development, a story is a particular business need assigned to the software development team.
  • story point (story points) - Story points are used in agile project management and development to determine the difficulty of implementing a particular story (business need).
  • sunsetting - Sunsetting, in a business context, is intentionally and gradually phasing something out.
  • support-driven development - Support-driven development is a strategy used by developers to create products that fit the needs of customers by designing them based on direct customer feedback.
  • T-shaped employee - A T-shaped employee, in the context of human resources, is an individual that has a depth of knowledge and skills in a particular area of specialization, along with a breadth of knowledge in related areas and the ability to make connections across disciplines.
  • take off - Take off, sometimes spelled as "take-off" or "takeoff," is a part of the cost estimating process in the construction industry.
  • team collaboration - Team collaboration is a communication and project management approach that emphasizes teamwork, innovative thinking and equal participation to achieve objectives.
  • team collaboration tools - Team collaboration tools -- also known as team collaboration software -- is a term used to define the different types of software and online services available to companies and individuals that enable them to feasibly work together on common projects, regardless of their physical location.
  • terminology management - Terminology management is the systematized collection of concepts and terms with the purpose of unifying and standardizing technical documentation.
  • The Phoenix Project - The Phoenix Project is a novel about the recovery of a late and over-budget IT project by Gene Kim, George Spafford, and Kevin Behr.
  • think tank - A think tank is an organization that gathers a group of interdisciplinary scholars to perform research around particular policies, issues or ideas.
  • third party - A third party is an entity that is involved in some way in an interaction that is primarily between two other entities.
  • time bank - A time bank is a reciprocity-based work trading system in which hours are the currency.
  • time management - Time management is the coordination of people's tasks and activities to maximize the effectiveness of their efforts.
  • time value of money - Time value of money is the concept that money acquired sooner or held onto longer has a greater worth or potential worth due to the possible accumulation of interest or ROI while that money is saved or invested.
  • timebox - In agile software development, a timebox is a defined period of time during which a task must be accomplished.
  • timeboxing - A timebox is a strictly-enforced limit on how long a given task or project can take: There is no allowance made for the possibility of extension.
  • Top searches of 2008 - What were people searching the WhatIs.
  • Toyota Way - The Toyota Way is a comprehensive expression of the company's management philosophy, which is based on the two foundational principles of Continuous Improvement (kaizen) and Respect for People.
  • triage - Triage is the procedure of assigning levels of priority to tasks or individuals to determine the most effective order in which to deal with them.
  • triple bottom line (3BL) - The triple bottom line (3BL) is an expanded version of the business concept of the bottom line that includes social and environmental results as well as financial results.
  • triple constraint - The project management triangle is also known as the triple constraint, the project management triple constraint and the the iron triangle.
  • two pizza rule - The two pizza rule is a guideline for limiting the number of attendees at a meeting.
  • Unfreeze, Change, Refreeze (Kurt Lewin Change Management Model) - Unfreeze, Change, Refreeze, also known as the Kurt Lewin Change Management Model, is a method for managing change within an organization.
  • unique selling point (USP) - A unique selling proposition (USP, also seen as unique selling point) is a factor that differentiates a product from its competitors, such as the lowest cost, the highest quality or the first-ever product of its kind.
  • Universal Business Language (UBL) - Universal Business Language (UBL) is a royalty-free set of documents based on the ebXML (Electronic Business XML) Core Components Technical Specification, also known as ISO 15000-5.
  • unknown known - An unknown known is information that an individual or organization has in its possession but whose existence, relevance or value has not been realized.
  • use case diagram (UML use case diagram) - A use case is a methodology used in system analysis to identify, clarify, and organize system requirements; a use case diagram is a graphic depiction of the interactions among the elements of a system.
  • V-Model (Vee-Model) - The V-Model, also called the Vee-Model, is a product-development process originally developed in Germany for government defense projects.
  • validated learning - Validated learning is an approach to demonstrating progress against business goals when traditional key performance indicators (KPIs) are not very useful.
  • VAR-to-VAR - VAR-to-VAR is a business model based on cooperation between value-added resellers (VARs) that allows the companies to obtain professional services and solutions outside their specialties or geographic areas.
  • vendor neutral - Vendor neutrality is a business and design approach that seeks to ensure broad compatibility and interchangeability of products and technologies.
  • versioning - Versioning is the creation and management of multiple releases of a product, all of which have the same general function but are improved, upgraded or customized.
  • vision statement - A vision statement is an organization's declaration of its mid-term and long-term goals, stating what they want to become in the future.
  • VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) - VUCA is an acronym that stands for volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity, a combination of qualities that, taken together, characterize the nature of some difficult conditions and situations.

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