Browse Definitions :

Protocols

Terms related to communication protocols, including definitions about TCP, IP, UDP, POP, SMTP, HTTP, XML, W-CDMA and FTP.

802 - MUL

  • 802.11n - 802.11n is an addition to the 802.
  • AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) - AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) is a way to map between the physical hardware addresses of computers, such as those known to an Ethernet or token ring local area network, and their temporarily assigned AppleTalk network addresses.
  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) - Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a procedure for mapping a dynamic Internet Protocol address (IP address) to a permanent physical machine address in a local area network (LAN).
  • anonymous FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - Using the Internet's File Transfer Protocol (FTP), anonymous FTP is a method for giving users access to files so that they don't need to identify themselves to the server.
  • anti-replay protocol - The anti-replay protocol is part of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) standard.
  • API testing - API testing refers to various methods of software testing used to determine if application programming interfaces (APIs) meet expectations of functionality, reliability, performance and security.
  • APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication or LU 6.2) - APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication, sometimes called LU 6.
  • AppleScript - AppleScript is a programming language that allows Macintosh users to automate repetitive tasks and to customize applications to suit specific needs.
  • AppleTalk - AppleTalk is a set of local area network communication protocols originally created for Apple computers.
  • ATA over Ethernet (AoE) - ATA over Ethernet (AoE) is an open source network protocol designed to connect storage devices and servers in a storage area network (SAN).
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based operating systems (included in Windows 98, ME, 2000, and XP) that enables a computer to automatically assign itself an IP address when there is no Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server available to perform that function.
  • automatic repeat request (ARQ) - Automatic repeat request (ARQ) is a protocol for error control in data transmission.
  • BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) - BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) is a protocol that manages how packets are routed across the internet through the exchange of routing and reachability information between edge routers.
  • BitTorrent - BitTorrent is a content distribution protocol that enables efficient software distribution and peer-to-peer sharing of very large files, such as entire movies and TV shows, by enabling users to serve as network redistribution points.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) - BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is a protocol that lets a network user be automatically configured (receive an IP address) and have an operating system booted (initiated) without user involvement.
  • Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (BISDN) - BISDN is both a concept and a set of services and developing standards for integrating digital transmission services in a broadband network of fiber optic and radio media.
  • Business Transaction Protocol (BTP) - The Business Transaction Protocol (BTP) is an XML-based protocol being developed by the Business Transactions Technical Committee (BT TC) of the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) as a standardized Internet-based means of managing complex, ongoing business-to-business (B2B) transactions among multiple organizations.
  • CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) - CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) refers to any of several protocols used in second-generation (2G) and third-generation (3G) wireless communications.
  • CDMA One (cdmaOne or code-division multiple access one) - Also see CDMA, WCDMA, and CDMA2000.
  • CDMA2000 (IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or code-division multiple access 2000) - CDMA2000, also known as IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or 1xRTT, is a code-division multiple access (CDMA) version of the IMT-2000 standard developed by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
  • CoIP (communications over Internet Protocol) - CoIP (communications over Internet Protocol) is a set of standards defining the transmission of multimedia over the Internet.
  • Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP) - Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP) is a network management protocol built on the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model.
  • connection-oriented - In telecommunications, connection-oriented describes a means of transmitting data in which the devices at the end points use a preliminary protocol to establish an end-to-end connection before any data is sent.
  • connectionless - In telecommunication, connectionless describes communication between two network end points in which a message can be sent from one end point to another without prior arrangement.
  • COPS (Common Open Policy Service Protocol) - COPS (Common Open Policy Service Protocol) is a proposed standard protocol for exchanging network policy information between a policy decision point (PDP) in a network and policy enforcement points (PEPs) as part of overall Quality of Service (QoS) - the allocation of network traffic resources according to desired priorities of service.
  • CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) - CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) is the two-level scheme for authenticating network users that is used as part of the Web's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
  • Data-Link layer - The data link layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data into and out of a physical link in a network.
  • DEN (Directory-Enabled Networking) - Directory-Enabled Networking (DEN) is an industry-standard initiative and specification for how to construct and store information about a network's users, applications, and data in a central directory.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) - The Distributed Management Task Force, Inc.
  • DROP (delivery of real-time execution information protocol) - DROP (delivery of real-time execution information protocol) is a feature of various NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) protocols that allows a subscriber to continuously view vital information about trades including the date and time, the participants (by symbol or icon), order identification data, condensed descriptions, the exchange prices and relevant commissions.
  • DSTP (Data Space Transfer Protocol) - DSTP (Data Space Transfer Protocol) is a protocol that is used to index and retrieve data from a number of databases, files, and other data structures using a key that can find all the related data about a particular object across all of the data.
  • DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) - DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) is the oldest routing protocol that has been used to support multicast data transmission over networks.
  • EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) - EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) is a network protocol that lets routers exchange information more efficiently than with earlier network protocols.
  • encoding and decoding - Encoding is the process of putting a sequence of characters (letters, numbers, punctuation, and certain symbols) into a specialized digital format for efficient transmission or transfer.
  • ES-IS (End System-to-Intermediate System) - ES-IS (End System-to-Intermediate System) is a routing protocol developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as part of their Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model.
  • ESMTP (Extended Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) - ESMTP (Extended Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) specifies extensions to the original protocol for sending e-mail that supports graphics, audio and video files, and text in various national languages.
  • Ethernet/IP (Ethernet Industrial Protocol) - Ethernet/IP (Ethernet Industrial Protocol) is a network communication standard capable of handling large amounts of data at speeds of 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, and at up to 1500 bytes per packet.
  • ETRN (Extended Turn) - ETRN (Extended Turn) is an extension to the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) that allows an SMTP server to send a request to another SMTP server to send any e-mail messages it has.
  • EV-DO (1x Evolution-Data Optimized) - 1x Evolution-Data Optimized, (EV-DO) is a 3G wireless radio broadband data standard.
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) - The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands on authentication methods used by the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), a protocol often used when connecting a computer to the Internet.
  • Extensible Name Service (XNS) - Extensible Name Service (XNS) is an open Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based protocol that specifies a way to establish and manage a universal addressing system.
  • Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP) - Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP) is a protocol for exchanging routing information between two neighbor gateway hosts (each with its own router) in a network of autonomous systems.
  • Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP or FC/IP) - Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP or FC/IP, also known as Fibre Channel tunneling or storage tunneling) is an Internet Protocol (IP)-based storage networking technology developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).
  • FTAM (File Transfer Access Method) - File Transfer Access Method (FTAM), also known as File Transfer Access and Management or Electronic File Transfer Access Method (EFTAM), is an ISO standard that specifies methods of transfering files between networked computers.
  • FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a client-server standard used to transfer files between computers over the Internet using control and data channels.
  • G.711 - G.711 is the default pulse code modulation (PCM) standard for Internet Protocol (IP) private branch exchange (PBX) vendors, as well as for the public switched telephone network (PSTN).
  • G.722 - G.722 is a standard for high-quality digital voice communications that is expected to lead to increased use in Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).
  • G.723.1 - G.723.
  • GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol) - GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol) is a local area network (LAN) protocol that defines procedures by which end stations and switches can register and de-register attributes, such as network identifiers or addresses, with each other.
  • GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching or Multiprotocol Lambda Switching) - GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching), also known as Multiprotocol Lambda Switching, is a technology that provides enhancements to Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) to support network switching for time, wavelength, and space switching as well as for packet switching.
  • GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol or Generic VLAN Registration Protocol) - GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol or Generic VLAN Registration Protocol) is a protocol that facilitates control of virtual local area networks (VLANs) within a larger network .
  • H.245 - H.245 is a protocol for the transmission of call management and control signals in packet-based networks using H.
  • H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) - H.264, also known as MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding), is a video compression standard that offers significantly greater compression than its predecessors.
  • H.323 - H.323 is a standard approved by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in 1996 to promote compatibility in videoconference transmissions over IP networks.
  • HDLC (High-level Data Link Control) - HDLC (High-level Data Link Control) is a group of protocols or rules for transmitting data between network points (sometimes called nodes).
  • HELLO packet - In the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) communications protocol - which enables network routers to share information with each other, a HELLO packet is a special packet (message) that is sent out periodically from a router to establish and confirm network adjacency relationships.
  • Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) - Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) is the proposed enhancement of Mobile Internet Protocol versions 6 (MIPv6) that is designed to reduce the amount of signaling required and to improve handoffspeed for mobile connections.
  • HiP7 and HiP8 - HiP7 and HiP8 are abbreviations for two versions of HiPerMOS, a complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) microchip technology invented by Motorola.
  • HIPPI (High-Performance Parallel Interface) - HIPPI (High-Performance Parallel Interface) is a standard point-to-point protocol for transmitting large amounts of data at up to billions of bits per second over relatively short distances, mainly on local area networks (LAN s).
  • Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) - Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) is a routing protocol that allows host computers on the Internet to use multiple routers that act as a single virtual router, maintaining connectivity even if the first hop router fails, because other routers are on "hot standby" - ready to go.
  • HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) - HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the set of rules for transferring files, such as text, graphic images, sound, video, and other multimedia files, on the World Wide Web.
  • HTTP 1.1 - HTTP 1.1 is the latest version of Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the World Wide Web application protocol that runs on top of the Internet's TCP/IP suite of protocols.
  • HTTPS (HTTP over SSL or HTTP Secure) - HTTPS (HTTP over SSL or HTTP Secure) is the use of Secure Socket Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) as a sublayer under regular HTTP application layering.
  • Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon (HTTPD) - On the Web, each server has an HTTPD or Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon that waits in attendance for requests to come in from the rest of the Web.
  • ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) - ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) is an error-reporting and message-control protocol that network devices use to report problems in IP packet delivery.
  • iFCP (Internet Fibre Channel Protocol) - iFCP (Internet Fibre Channel Protocol) is an emerging standard for extending Fibre Channel storage networks across the Internet.
  • IGP (Interior Gateway Protocol) - An IGP (Interior Gateway Protocol) is a protocol for exchanging routing information between gateways (hosts with routers) within an autonomous network (for example, a system of corporate local area networks).
  • IIOP (Internet Inter-ORB Protocol) - IIOP (Internet Inter-ORB Protocol) is a protocol that makes it possible for distributed programs written in different programming languages to communicate over the Internet.
  • Information Kit: Voice over IP - What is voice over IP (VoIP)? Expert advice: VoIP certification, Implementing VoIP in a small business, Using VoIP at home.
  • Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) - Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) is a set of standards that makes all electronic purchase transactions consistent for customers, merchants, and other involved parties, regardless of payment system.
  • Internet Protocol - The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet.
  • IP address (Internet Protocol Address) - This definition is based on Internet Protocol Version 4.
  • IP core (intellectual property core) - An IP (intellectual property) core is a block of logic or data that is used in making a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a product.
  • IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) - The IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) is a concept for an integrated network of telecommunications carriers that would facilitate the use of IP (Internet Protocol) for packet communications in all known forms over wireless or landline.
  • IP storage - IP storage is a general term for several approaches to using the Internet Protocol (IP) in a storage area network (SAN) usually over Gigabit Ethernet.
  • IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) - IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) is a general term for the technologies that use the Internet Protocol's packet-switched connections to exchange voice, fax, and other forms of information that have traditionally been carried over the dedicated circuit-switched connections of the public switched telephone network (PSTN).
  • IPI (Intelligent Peripheral Interface) - IPI (Intelligent Peripheral Interface) is a high-bandwidth interface between a computer and a hard disk or a tape device.
  • IPLC (international private leased circuit) - An IPLC (international private leased circuit) is a point-to-point private line used by an organization to communicate between offices that are geographically dispersed throughout the world.
  • IPPP (Internet presence provider and promoter) - An IPPP (Internet presence provider and promoter) is a company that helps an enterprise create a Web site, arrange for hosting (housing, maintaining, and providing Internet access) for the Web site, and promote an audience for it.
  • IPsec (Internet Protocol Security) - IPsec, also known as the Internet Protocol Security or IP Security protocol, defines the architecture for security services for IP network traffic.
  • IPTV (Internet Protocol television) - IPTV (Internet Protocol television) is a service that provides television programming and other video content using the TCP/IP protocol suite as opposed to traditional cable or satellite signals.
  • IPv6 (Internet Protocol Version 6) - IPv6 (Internet Protocol Version 6) is the latest level of the Internet Protocol (IP) and is now included as part of IP support in many products including the major computer operating systems.
  • IPX (Internetwork Packet Exchange) - IPX (Internetwork Packet Exchange) is a networking protocol from Novell that interconnects networks that use Novell's NetWare clients and servers.
  • IS-IS (Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System protocol) - One of the most commonly used routing protocols, the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System protocol (IS-IS) is based on a routing method known as DECnet Phase V routing, in which routers known as intermediate systems exchange data about routing using a single metric to determine the network topology.
  • ITCH - ITCH is a direct data-feed interface that allows customers of the NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) to observe or disseminate information about stock trading activities.
  • Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) - Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) is an extension of the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) used by an Internet service provider (ISP) to enable the operation of a virtual private network (VPN) over the Internet.
  • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) - LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate organizations, individuals, and other resources such as files and devices in a network, whether on the public Internet or on a corporate intranet.
  • Link Control Protocol (LCP) - In the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), the Link ControlProtocol (LCP) establishes, configures, and tests data-link Internet connections.
  • Manufacturing Message Specification (MMS) - The Manufacturing Message Specification (MMS) is an international standard that defines the ways in which control information is transferred among intelligent devices and systems such as computers and robots.
  • Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) - Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), also known as H.
  • MIME (Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions) - What is MIME? MIME (Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions) is an extension of the original Internet e-mail protocol that lets people use the protocol to exchange different kinds of data files on the Internet: audio, video, images, application programs, and other kinds, as well as the ASCII text handled in the original protocol, the Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP).
  • Mobile IP - Mobile IP is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard communications protocol that is designed to allow mobile device users to move from one network to another while maintaining their permanent IP address.
  • Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6 or Mobile Internet Protocol version 6) - Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is a protocol developed as a subset of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to support mobile connections.
  • modem error-correcting protocols - The protocols that modems agree on and use for checking and correcting transmission errors have evolved toward accuracy, speed, and efficiency since 1978 when the Xmodem protocol became a de facto standard.
  • MPPE (Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption) - MPPE (Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption) is a method of encrypting data transferred across Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)-based dial-up connections or Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) virtual private network (VPN) connections.

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