Browse Definitions :

Protocols

Terms related to communication protocols, including definitions about TCP, IP, UDP, POP, SMTP, HTTP, XML, W-CDMA and FTP.

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  • Multicast Dissemination Protocol (MDP) - The Multicast Dissemination Protocol (MDP) is a communications protocol for one-to-many transmissions in wired or wireless networks.
  • multichassis multilink PPP (MMP) - Multichassis multilink PPP (MMP) is an extension of multilink PPP (MP) in which the subscriber can consist of more than one computer.
  • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) - Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a protocol-agnostic routing technique designed to speed up and shape traffic flows across enterprise wide area and service provider networks.
  • NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol) - NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol) is an open protocol used to control data backup and recovery communications between primary and secondary storage in a heterogeneous network environment.
  • NetFlow - NetFlow is a network protocol developed by Cisco for the collection and monitoring of network traffic flow data that is generated by most Cisco routers and switches.
  • network protocols - Network protocols are sets of established rules that dictate how to format, transmit and receive data so computer network devices -- from servers and routers to endpoints -- can communicate regardless of the differences in their underlying infrastructures, designs or standards.
  • Network Time Protocol (NTP) - Network Time Protocol (NTP) is a protocol used to synchronize computer clock times in a network.
  • Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) - In a computer network, the Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) is a protocol or method that can be used so that a computer sending data to another computer can learn the most direct route (the fewest number of hops) to the receiving computer.
  • Next Steps in Signaling (NSIS) - NSIS (Next Steps in Signaling) is an evolving communication protocol intended to facilitate signaling at the Transport layer, using a two-level model to support diverse services and resources.
  • NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol) - NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol) is the predominant protocol used by computer clients and servers for managing the notes posted on Usenet newsgroups.
  • OCSP (Online Certificate Status Protocol) - OCSP (Online Certificate Status Protocol) is one of two common schemes for maintaining the security of a server and other network resources.
  • OLTP (online transaction processing) - OLTP (online transaction processing) is a class of software programs capable of supporting transaction-oriented applications on the Internet.
  • Open Data-Link Interface (ODI) - ODI (Open Data-Link Interface) is a software interface that allows different Data-Link Layer protocols to share the same driver or adapter in a computer.
  • OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) - The OSPF router protocol is used to find the best path for packets as they pass through a set of connected networks.
  • OTTO protocol (OUCH To Trade Options) - OTTO (OUCH To Trade Options) is a digital communications protocol that allows customers of the NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) to conduct business in the options market.
  • OUCH protocol - OUCH is a digital communications protocol that allows customers of the NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) to conduct business in the options market.
  • P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences) - P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences) is a protocol that specifies a way to determine if a Web site's security policies meet a user's privacy requirements.
  • passive FTP - Passive FTP (sometimes referred to as PASV FTP because it involves the FTP PASV command) is a more secure form of data transfer in which the flow of data is set up and initiated by the File Transfer Program (FTP) client rather than by the FTP server program.
  • PCoIP (PC over IP) - PC over IP (PCoIP) is a remote display protocol that Teradici developed for delivering remote desktops and applications to endpoints.
  • Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) - Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a protocol (set of communication rules) that allows corporations to extend their own corporate network through private "tunnels" over the public Internet.
  • poison reverse - In a computer network that uses the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or other distance vector routing protocols, a poison reverse is a way in which a gateway node tells its neighbor gateways that one of the gateways is no longer connected.
  • POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3) - POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3) is the most recent version of a standard protocol for receiving e-mail.
  • PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) - PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) is a standard used to establish a direct connection between two network nodes that enables the transport of multiprotocol data.
  • PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) - PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) is a specification for connecting multiple computer users on an Ethernet local area network to a remote site through common customer premises equipment, which is the telephone company's term for a modem and similar devices.
  • Q signaling (QSIG) - Q signaling (abbreviated QSIG), a protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications based on the Q.
  • Q.931 - Q.931 (also called Q93 is a signaling protocol for Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications that is used in voice over IP (VoIP).
  • QIX (NASDAQ Information Exchange protocol) - QIX (NASDAQ Information Exchange protocol) is a proprietary specification intended to streamline automated trading in the financial industry.
  • RASHport (Routing and Special Handling) - RASHport, also called RASH (Routing and Special Handling), is a digital communications protocol that allows customers of the NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) to conduct business in the options market.
  • Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) - Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is an application-level network communication system that transfers real-time data from multimedia to an endpoint device by communicating directly with the server streaming the data.
  • Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) - The Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) is an Internet protocol standard that specifies a way for programs to manage the real-time transmission of multimedia data over either unicast or multicast network services.
  • remote desktop - Remote desktop is a program or an operating system feature that allows a user to connect to a computer in another location, see that computer's desktop and interact with it as if it were local.
  • remote desktop protocol (RDP) - Remote desktop protocol (RDP) is a secure network communications protocol designed for remote management, as well as for remote access to virtual desktops, applications and an RDP terminal server.
  • Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP) - RARP (Reverse Address Resolution Protocol) is a protocol by which a physical machine in a local area network can request to learn its IP address from a gateway server's Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) table or cache.
  • route summarization (route aggregation) - Route summarization, also called route aggregation, is a method of minimizing the number of routing tables in an IP (Internet Protocol) network.
  • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) - RIP (Routing Information Protocol) is a protocol used to enable routers to share information about IP traffic routes as they move traffic within a larger network made up of separate LANs linked through routers.
  • RS-232C - RS-232C is a long-established standard ("C" is the current version) that describes the physical interface and protocol for relatively low-speed serial data communication between computers and related devices.
  • RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) - RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol) is a set of communication rules that allows channels or paths on the Internet to be reserved for the multicast (one source to many receivers) transmission of video and other high-bandwidth messages.
  • S-HTTP (Secure HTTP) - S-HTTP (Secure HTTP) is an extension to the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that allows the secure exchange of files on the World Wide Web.
  • S/MIME (Secure Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions) - S/MIME (Secure Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions) is a secure method of sending e-mail that uses the Rivest-Shamir-Adleman encryption system.
  • SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) - SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) is a protocol for transmitting multiple streams of data at the same time between two end points that have established a connection in a network.
  • SDP (Session Description Protocol) - SDP (Session Description Protocol) is a set of rules that defines how multimedia sessions can be set up to allow all end points to effectively participate in the session.
  • Secure Shell (SSH) - SSH, also known as Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell, is a network protocol that gives users, particularly system administrators, a secure way to access a computer over an unsecured network.
  • Sender ID - Sender ID is Microsoft's proposed e-mail sender authentication protocol designed to protect against domain spoofing and phishing exploits.
  • Sequenced Packet Exchange (SPX) - SPX (Sequenced Packet Exchange) is the protocol for handling packet sequencing in a Novell NetWare network.
  • Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) - SLIP is a TCP/IP protocol used for communication between two machines that are previously configured for communication with each other.
  • Server Message Block Protocol (SMB protocol) - The Server Message Block Protocol (SMB protocol) is a client-server communication protocol used for sharing access to files, printers, serial ports and other resources on a network.
  • Service Location Protocol (SLP) - The Service Location Protocol (SLP) is a protocol or method of organizing and locating the resources (such as printers, disk drives, databases, e-mail directories, and schedulers) in a network.
  • Session Announcement Protocol (SAP) - Session Announcement Protocol (SAP) is a protocol used to define the format and describe the information that will be exchanged during a multicast conferencing session.
  • Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) - Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a signaling protocol used for initiating, maintaining, modifying and terminating real-time sessions that involve video, voice, messaging and other communications applications and services between two or more endpoints on IP networks.
  • short message service center (SMSC) - A short message service center (SMSC) is the portion of a wireless network that handles SMS operations, such as routing, forwarding and storing incoming text messages on their way to desired endpoints.
  • SIGTRAN (Signaling Transport) - SIGTRAN (for Signaling Transport) is the standard telephony protocol used to transport Signaling System 7 (SS7) signals over the Internet.
  • SIMPLE (SIP for Instant Messaging and Presence Leveraging Extensions) - SIMPLE is an add-on to the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) that some industry insiders predict will be the basis for a new Instant Messaging and Presence Protocol (IMPP).
  • Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) - Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer protocol used to manage and monitor network devices and their functions.
  • Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) - Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) is a Cisco proprietary standard for terminal control for use with voice over IP (VoIP).
  • sliding windows (windowing) - Sliding windows, a technique also known as windowing, is used by the Internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) as a method of controlling the flow of packets between two computers or network hosts.
  • SMS gateway - An SMS gateway is a Web site that allow users to send SMS messages from a Web browswer to people within the cell served by that gateway.
  • SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) - SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is a TCP/IP protocol used in sending and receiving e-mail.
  • SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) - SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), which is based in Extensible Markup Language (XML), facilitates communication between application and operating systems.
  • socks - Socks (or "SOCKS") is a protocol that a proxy server can use to accept requests from client users in a company's network so that it can forward them across the Internet.
  • spanning tree protocol (STP) - Spanning tree protocol (STP) is a Layer 2 network protocol used to prevent looping within a network topology.
  • SRTP (Secure Real-Time Transport Protocol or Secure RTP) - SRTP (Secure Real-Time Transport Protocol or Secure RTP) is an extension to RTP (Real-Time Transport Protocol) that incorporates enhanced security features.
  • stand-up - In agile software development, a stand-up is a daily progress meeting, traditionally held within a development area.
  • static IP address/dynamic IP address - A static IP address is a number (in the form of a dotted quad) that is assigned to a computer by an Internet service provider (ISP) to be its permanent address on the Internet.
  • stream recorder (stream ripper) - What is stream recorder?A stream recorder (sometimes called a stream ripper) is a program used to save streaming media to a file so that it can be accessed locally.
  • STUN (Simple Traversal of UDP through NAT) - Simple Traversal of UDP through NAT (STUN) is a protocol that governs the exchange of data over a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) connection by communications devices operating behind a Network Address Translator (NAT) or firewall.
  • Synclink Dynamic RAM - SyncLink SDRAM, along with Direct Rambus DRAM, is a protocol -based approach where all signals to random access memory (RAM) are on the same line.
  • TACACS (Terminal Access Controller Access Control System) - TACACS (Terminal Access Controller Access Control System) is an older authentication protocol common to UNIX networks that allows a remote access server to forward a user's logon password to an authentication server to determine whether access can be allowed to a given system.
  • TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) - TCP/IP, or the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, is a suite of communication protocols used to interconnect network devices on the internet.
  • TD-SCDMA (time division synchronous code division multiple access) - TD-SCDMA (time division synchronous code division multiple access) is a mobile telephone standard for wireless network operators who want to move from a second generation (2G) wireless network to a third-generation (3G) one.
  • Technical Office Protocol (TOP) - Technical Office Protocol (TOP), also called Technical and Office Protocol, is a set of protocols intended for networks that perform distributed information processing in business offices.
  • time-to-live (TTL) - Time-to-live (TTL) is a value in an Internet Protocol (IP) packet that tells a network router whether or not the packet has been in the network too long and should be discarded.
  • TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) - TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) is an encryption protocol included as part of the IEEE 802.
  • Top searches of 2008 - What were people searching the WhatIs.
  • Traversal Using Relay NAT (TURN) - Traversal Using Relay NAT (TURN) is a protocol, currently at the working draft stage, that is intended to govern the reception of data over a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram Protocol (UDP) connection by a single communications device operating behind a Network Address Translator (NAT) or firewall.
  • Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) - Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is an Internet software utility for transferring files that is simpler to use than the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) but less capable.
  • Ultra DMA (UDMA or Ultra DMA/33) - Ultra DMA (UDMA, or, more accurately, Ultra DMA/33) is a protocol for transferring data between a hard disk drive through the computer's data paths (or bus) to the computer's random access memory (RAM).
  • UUCP (UNIX-to-UNIX Copy Protocol) - UUCP (UNIX-to-UNIX Copy Protocol) is a set of UNIX programs for copying (sending) files between different UNIX systems and for sending commands to be executed on another system.
  • VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol) - VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol) is an Internet protocol that provides a way to have one or more backup routers when using a statically configured router on a local area network (LAN).
  • W-CDMA (Wideband Code-Division Multiple Access) - Also see CDMA, CDMA One, and CDMA2000.
  • WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) - WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) is a specification for a set of communication protocols to standardize the way that wireless devices, such as cellular telephones and radio transceivers, can be used for Internet access.
  • WAX (Wireless Abstract XML) - Wireless Abstract XML (WAX) is an abstract markup language and associated tools that facilitate wireless application development.
  • Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) - Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) is a proposed Internet protocol that allows a client, such as a Web browser or a streaming media application, to automatically locate and interface with cache services in a network so that information can be delivered more quickly to the user.
  • Words-to-Go: Voice over IP - Internet Protocol (IP) - method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet.
  • X.25 - The X.25 protocol, adopted as a standard by the Consultative Committee for International Telegraph and Telephone (CCITT), is a commonly-used network protocol.
  • Xmodem - Xmodem is an error-correcting protocol for modem that was created in 1978 by Ward Christensen and became a de facto standard.
  • XMPP (Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol) - XMPP (Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol) is a protocol based on Extensible Markup Language (XML) and intended for instant messaging (IM) and online presence detection.
  • Xon/Xoff (X-on/X-off or XON/XOFF) - Xon/Xoff (sometimes written "X-on/X-off" or "XON/XOFF" and pronounced eks-AWN eks-AWF) is a protocol for controlling the flow of data between computers and other devices on an asynchronous serial connection.
  • Ymodem - Ymodem is an error-correcting protocol for a modem that uses larger data blocks for greater efficiency.
  • Z39.50 - Z39.50 is a standard communications protocol for the search and retrieval of bibliographic data in online databases.
  • Zmodem protocol - Zmodem is an error-correcting protocol for modems.

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