Browse Definitions :

Routing and switching

Terms related to routers and switches, including definitions about hubs and words and phrases about packet-switched networks.

32- - SDN

  • 32-bit IP addressing - 32-bit IP addressing is the IP address scheme used in Internet Protocol 4 (IPv6 uses a 128-bit system).
  • ABCD data switch - An ABCD data switch is a small box that lets you hook up to four devices from one PC serial or parallel port on your computer.
  • access layer - The access layer is where host computers and end users connect to the network.
  • adaptive routing (dynamic routing) - Adaptive routing, also called dynamic routing, is a process for determining the optimal path a data packet should follow through a network to arrive at a specific destination.
  • bogon - A bogon is an illegitimate IP address that falls into a set of IP addresses that have not been officially assigned to an entity by an internet registration institute, such as the Internet Assigned Number Authority (IANA).
  • brouter - A brouter (pronounced BRAU-tuhr or sometimes BEE-rau-tuhr) is a network bridge and a router combined in a single product.
  • canonical name - A canonical name is the properly denoted host name of a computer or network server.
  • Carrier Sensitive Routing (CSR) - Carrier Sensitive Routing (CSR) is a network solution that allows Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) subscribers to determine and manipulate the routing of individual calls.
  • CE router (customer edge router) - A CE router (customer edge router) is a router located on the customer premises that provides an Ethernet interface between the customer's LAN and the provider's core network.
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) is a way to allocate Internet addresses more flexibly than the original system of Internet Protocol (IP) address classes allowed.
  • circuit-switched - Circuit-switched is a type of network in which a physical path is obtained for and dedicated to a single connection between two end-points in the network for the duration of the connection.
  • Cisco Discovery Protocol - The Cisco Discovery Protocol is a Layer-2 protocol used to share data about other Cisco equipment that is directly connected nearby.
  • Cisco Integrated Service Routers Generation 2 (ISR G2) - ISR G2 is a second generation Integrated Services Router (ISR) from Cisco Systems, Inc.
  • Cisco IOS (Cisco Internetwork Operating System) - Cisco IOS (Internetwork Operating System) is a proprietary operating system that runs on most Cisco Systems routers and switches.
  • Cisco LISP (Location Identifier Separation Protocol) - LISP (Location Identifier Separation Protocol) is a routing and addressing architecture developed by Cisco Systems.
  • Cisco Systems, Inc. - Cisco Systems, Inc.
  • CNAME - A CNAME specifies an alias or nickname for a canonical name record in a domain name system (DNS) database.
  • core router - A core router is a router that forwards packets to computer hosts within a network (but not between networks).
  • cross-bar switch - In a network, a cross-bar switch is a device that is capable of channeling data between any two devices that are attached to it up to its maximum number of ports.
  • cross-media queuing - In a call center, cross-media queuing describes the process of receiving and routing all incoming queries in the same way, whether the query comes in the form of a phone call, e-mail message, instant message, Web site submission, fax or interactive voice response (IVR) message.
  • delay-tolerant network - A delay-tolerant network is a network designed to operate effectively over extreme distances such as those encountered in space communications or on an interplanetary scale.
  • demand-based switching (DBS) - Demand-based switching (DBS) is a power-management technology developed by Intel in which the applied voltage and clock speed for a microprocessor are kept to the minimum necessary to allow optimum performance of required operations.
  • DEN (Directory-Enabled Networking) - Directory-Enabled Networking (DEN) is an industry-standard initiative and specification for how to construct and store information about a network's users, applications, and data in a central directory.
  • digital switch - A digital switch is a device that handles digital signals generated at or passed through a telephone company central office and forwards them across the company's backbone network.
  • DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) - DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) is the oldest routing protocol that has been used to support multicast data transmission over networks.
  • Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) - Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) is a self-maintaining routing protocol for wireless networks.
  • edge provider - An edge provider is a service that a given ISP’s customers connect to that is not inside that provider’s network and does not belong to them.
  • edge router - An edge router is a specialized router located at a network boundary that enables a campus network to connect to external networks.
  • EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) - EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) is a network protocol that lets routers exchange information more efficiently than with earlier network protocols.
  • event handler - An event handler is a callback routine that operates asynchronously and handles inputs received into a program.
  • event handling - Event handling is the receipt of an event at some event handler from an event producer and subsequent processes.
  • FCoE (Fibre Channel over Ethernet) - FCoE (Fibre Channel over Ethernet) is a storage protocol that enable Fibre Channel communications to run directly over Ethernet.
  • field of view (FOV) - Field of view (FOV) is the open observable area a person can see through his or her eyes or via an optical device.
  • fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) - A fixed-length subnet mask (FLSM) is a sequence of numbers of unchanging length that streamlines packet routing within the subnets of a proprietary network.
  • flow routing - Flow routing is a network routing technology that takes variations in the flow of data into account to increase routing efficiency.
  • Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) - Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) is a simple protocol that encapsulates packets in order to route other protocols over IP networks, as defined by RFC 2784.
  • green route - A green route is one of three categories of Internet route states defined by the Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project, an initiative dedicated to the development of tools that ISPs (Internet service providers), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.
  • grey route - A grey route is one of three categories of Internet routes defined by the Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project, an initiative dedicated to the development of tools that ISPs (Internet service providers), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.
  • High-Speed Circuit-Switched Data (HSCSD) - High-Speed Circuit-Switched Data (HSCSD) is circuit-switched wireless data transmission for mobile users at data rates up to 38.
  • Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) - Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) is a routing protocol that allows host computers on the Internet to use multiple routers that act as a single virtual router, maintaining connectivity even if the first hop router fails, because other routers are on "hot standby" - ready to go.
  • ingress - Ingress (pronounced IHN-grehs, from Latin ingressus or stepping into) is the act of entering something.
  • intelligent switch - An intelligent switch is a high-level storage area network (SAN) routing switch that provides features such as storage virtualization, quality of service (QoS), remote mirroring, data sharing, protocol conversion, and advanced security.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • Internet Routing in Space (IRIS) - Internet Routing in Space in Space, also known as (IRIS), is a project being conducted by the U.
  • IP address (Internet Protocol Address) - This definition is based on Internet Protocol Version 4.
  • IP SLA (Cisco) - IP SLA (Internet protocol service level agreement) is a feature of the Cisco IOS (Internetwork Operating System) that allows an IT professional to collect information about network performance in real time.
  • IPv4 address class - An IPv4 address class is a categorical division of internet protocol addresses in IPv4-based routing.
  • IS-IS (Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System protocol) - One of the most commonly used routing protocols, the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System protocol (IS-IS) is based on a routing method known as DECnet Phase V routing, in which routers known as intermediate systems exchange data about routing using a single metric to determine the network topology.
  • iterative DNS query - An iterative DNS query is a request for a website name or uniform resource locator (URL) that the domain name system (DNS) server responds to with the IP address from its zone file cache, if possible.
  • jumbo frames - A jumbo frame is an Ethernet frame with a payload greater than the standard maximum transmission unit (MTU) of 1,500 bytes.
  • key chain - A key chain is a series of keys that can be created to help ensure secure communication between routers in a network.
  • KVM switch (keyboard, video, mouse switch) - A KVM (keyboard, video, mouse) switch is a hardware device that allows a user to control multiple computers from a single keyboard, video display monitor and mouse.
  • lambda switching (photonic switching, or wavelength switching) - Lambda switching (sometimes called photonic switching, or wavelength switching) is the technology used in optical networking to switch individual wavelengths of light onto separate paths for specific routing of information.
  • layer 2 - Layer 2 refers to the Data Link layer of the commonly-referenced multilayered communication model, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI).
  • Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) - Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) is an extension of the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) used by an Internet service provider (ISP) to enable the operation of a virtual private network (VPN) over the Internet.
  • leaf-spine (leaf-spine architecture) - Leaf-spine is a two-layer network topology composed of leaf switches and spine switches.
  • Link Quality Source Routing (LQSR) - LQSR (Link Quality Source Routing) is a routing protocol for wireless mesh networks.
  • Location Routing Number (LRN) - In the U.S.
  • logical router - A logical router is a configured partition of a traditional network hardware, or "physical," router.
  • Metro Ethernet - Metro Ethernet is the use of Carrier Ethernet technology in metropolitan area networks (MANs).
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • MOSPF (Multicast Open Shortest Path First) - MOSPF (Multicast Open Shortest Path First) is an extension to the OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) protocol that facilitates interoperation between unicast and multicast routers.
  • mrouter (multicast router) - An mrouter, or multicast router, is a router program that distinguishes between multicast and unicast packets and determines how they should be distributed along the Multicast Internet (sometimes known as the Multicast Backbone or MBone).
  • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) - Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a protocol-agnostic routing technique designed to speed up and shape traffic flows across enterprise wide area and service provider networks.
  • NAT64 - NAT64 is a proposed mechanism for translating IPv6 packets to IPv4 packets and vice-versa.
  • NetFlow - NetFlow is a network protocol developed by Cisco for the collection and monitoring of network traffic flow data that is generated by most Cisco routers and switches.
  • network automation - Network automation is a methodology in which software automatically configures, provisions, manages and tests network devices.
  • network coding - Network coding is a method of optimizing the flow of digital data in a network by transmitting digital evidence about messages.
  • network switch - A network switch is a hardware device that channels incoming data from multiple input ports to a specific output port that will take it toward its intended destination.
  • northbound interface / southbound interface - A northbound interface is an interface that allows a particular component of a network to communicate with a higher-level component.
  • one-armed router - A one-armed router is a router that routes traffic between virtual local area networks (VLANs).
  • Open Networking Foundation (ONF) - The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is a consortium dedicated to the development and standardization of software-defined networking (SDN).
  • OpenFlow - OpenFlow is a protocol that allows a server to tell network switches where to send packets.
  • optical line terminal (OLT) - An optical line terminal (OLT) is a device that is located at the service provider's central office and is the endpoint of a passive optical network (PON).
  • OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) - The OSPF router protocol is used to find the best path for packets as they pass through a set of connected networks.
  • OVSDB (Open vSwitch Database Management Protocol) - The Open vSwitch Database Management Protocol (OVSDB) is an OpenFlow configuration protocol that is designed to manage Open vSwitch implementations.
  • P4P (proactive provider participation for P2P) - P4P (proactive provider participation for P2P) is a protocol designed to improve the use of available bandwidth in a P2P network by reducing the overall volume of traffic.
  • packet mangling - Packet mangling is the modification of packets at a packet-based network interface before and/or after routing.
  • packet-switched - Packet-switched describes the type of network in which relatively small units of data called packets are routed through a network based on the destination address contained within each packet.
  • PAIR (Policy Analysis of Internet Routing) - The Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project is a Merit Network initiative dedicated to developing tools that Internet service providers (ISPs), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.
  • path - In a computer operating system, a path is the route through a file system to a particular file.
  • physical layer - Located at the lowest layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model, the physical layer's function is to transport data using electrical, mechanical or procedural interfaces.
  • plane (in networking) - A plane, in a networking context, is one of three integral components of a telecommunications architecture.
  • Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) - Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a protocol (set of communication rules) that allows corporations to extend their own corporate network through private "tunnels" over the public Internet.
  • presentation layer - Residing at Layer 6 of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model, the presentation layer ensures that the communications that pass through it are in the appropriate form for the recipient application.
  • protocol-independent multicast (PIM) - Protocol-independent multicast (PIM) is a set of four specifications that define modes of Internet multicasting to allow one-to-many and many-to-many transmission of information.
  • Quagga - Quagga is an open source suite of applications for the management of routing protocols.
  • recursive DNS query - A recursive DNS query is a request from a client for a website that must be responded to with either the sought response or an error message stating that the site does not exist.
  • recursive DNS server - A recursive DNS server is a domain name system server that takes website name or URL (uniform resource locator) requests from users and checks the records attained from authoritative DNS servers for the associated IP address.
  • red route - A red route is one of three categories of Internet route states defined by the Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project, an initiative dedicated to the development of tools that ISPs (Internet service providers), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.
  • RFC 1918 - RFC 1918 specifies ranges of IP addresses for use in private networks.
  • rocker switch - A rocker switch is an on/off switch that rocks (rather than trips) when pressed, which means one side of the switch is raised while the other side is depressed much like a rocking horse rocks back and forth.
  • route aggregation - Route aggregation is an alternate term for route summarization, which is a method used to minimize the number of routing tables required in an IP network.
  • router - A router is a physical or virtual appliance that passes information between two or more packet-switched computer networks.
  • Routers: Do you speak geek? - by Kara GattineAre you a real Know-IT-All? How many of these router-related terms can you guess without peeking? 1.
  • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) - Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a distance vector protocol that uses hop count as its primary metric.
  • routing switch - In a network, a 'routing switch' is a device that combines the functions of a switch, which forwards data by looking at a physical device address, and a router, which forwards packets by locating a next hop address.
  • routing table - A routing table is a set of rules, often viewed in table format, that is used to determine where data packets traveling over an Internet Protocol (IP) network will be directed.
  • SAN routing - SAN (storage area network) routing is a technology used for interconnecting SAN islands (separately designated logical portions of a storage area network) within a larger network.
  • SDN controller (software-defined networking controller) - An SDN controller is an application in a software-defined networking (SDN) architecture that manages flow control for improved network management and application performance.

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