Browse Definitions :

Security

Terms related to security management, including definitions about intrusion detection systems (IDS) and words and phrases about asset management, security policies, security monitoring, authorization and authentication.

PIR - SMA

  • piracy - Software piracy is the illegal copying, distribution, or use of software.
  • PKI (public key infrastructure) - PKI (public key infrastructure) is the underlying framework that enables entities -- users and servers -- to securely exchange information using digital certificates.
  • plaintext - In cryptography, plaintext is ordinary readable text before being encrypted into ciphertext or after being decrypted.
  • Pokémon GO - Pokémon GO is a mobile augmented reality (AR) version of the popular Pokémon video game for iPhone or Android systems.
  • policy engine - A policy engine is a software component that allows an organization to create, monitor and enforce rules about how network resources and the organization's data can be accessed.
  • policy-based management - Policy-based management is an administrative approach that is used to simplify the management of a given endeavor by establishing policies to deal with situations that are likely to occur.
  • polymorphic virus - A polymorphic virus is a harmful, destructive or intrusive type of malware that can change or 'morph,' making it difficult to detect with antimalware programs.
  • port mirroring (roving analysis port) - Port mirroring is an approach to monitoring network traffic that involves forwarding a copy of each packet from one network switch port to another.
  • post-quantum cryptography - Post-quantum cryptography, also called quantum encryption, is the development of cryptographic systems for classical computers that are able to prevent attacks launched by quantum computers.
  • presence technology - Presence technology is a type of application that makes it possible to locate and identify a computing device wherever it might be, as soon as the user connects to the network.
  • Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) - Pretty Good Privacy or PGP is a popular program used to encrypt and decrypt email over the Internet, as well as authenticate messages with digital signatures and encrypted stored files.
  • principle of least privilege (POLP) - The principle of least privilege (POLP) is a concept in computer security that limits users' access rights to only what are strictly required to do their jobs.
  • privacy - On the Internet, privacy, a major concern of users, can be divided into these concerns: What personal information can be shared with whom Whether messages can be exchanged without anyone else seeing them Whether and how one can send messages anonymously Personal Information Privacy Most Web users want to understand that personal information they share will not be shared with anyone else without their permission.
  • Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) - The Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) are the UK implementation of the European Union (EU) e-Privacy Directive.
  • privacy compliance - Privacy compliance is a company's accordance with established personal information protection guidelines, specifications or legislation.
  • private CA (private PKI) - Private CA stands for private certification authority and is an enterprise specific CA that functions like a publicly trusted CA but is exclusively run by or for the enterprise.
  • private certificate authority (CA) - Private CA stands for private certificate authority and is an enterprise specific certificate authority that functions like a publicly trusted CA but is exclusively run by or for the enterprise.
  • private key - A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt data.
  • privileged identity management (PIM) - Privileged identity management (PIM) is the monitoring and protection of superuser accounts in an organization’s IT environments.
  • problem - A problem, in an IT service management (ITSM) context, is an issue that could cause an incident.
  • promiscuous mode - In computer networking, promiscuous mode is a mode of operation, as well as a security, monitoring and administration technique.
  • proxy firewall - A proxy firewall is a network security system that protects network resources by filtering messages at the application layer.
  • proxy hacking - Proxy hacking, also known as proxy hijacking, is an attack technique designed to supplant an authentic Web page in a search engine's index and search results pages.
  • public key - In cryptography, a public key is a large numerical value that is used to encrypt data.
  • public key certificate - A public key certificate is a digitally signed document that serves to validate the sender's authorization and name.
  • Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) - The Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) are a set of intervendor standard protocols for making possible secure information exchange on the Internet using a public key infrastructure (PKI).
  • PUP (potentially unwanted program) - A PUP (potentially unwanted program) is a program that may be unwanted, despite the possibility that users consented to download it.
  • Pwn2Own - Pwn2Own is an annual hacking competition sponsored by security vendor TippingPoint and held at the CanSecWest security conference.
  • quantum cryptography - Quantum cryptography uses our current knowledge of physics to develop a cryptosystem that is not able to be defeated - that is, one that is completely secure against being compromised without knowledge of the sender or the receiver of the messages.
  • RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) - RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) is a client-server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service.
  • rainbow table - A rainbow table is a listing of all possible plaintext permutations of encrypted passwords specific to a given hash algorithm.
  • RAT (remote access Trojan) - A remote access Trojan (RAT) is a malware program that gives an intruder administrative control over a target computer.
  • raw device mapping (RDM) - Raw device mapping (RDM) is an option in the VMware server virtualization environment that enables a storage LUN to be directly connected to a virtual machine from the SAN.
  • real-time location system (RTLS) - A real-time location system (RTLS) is one of a number of technologies used to pinpoint the current geographic position and location of a target.
  • Red Flags Rule (RFR) - The Red Flags Rule (RFR) is a set of United States federal regulations that require certain businesses and organizations to develop and implement documented plans to protect consumers from identity theft.
  • red teaming - Red teaming is the practice of rigorously challenging plans, policies, systems and assumptions by adopting an adversarial approach.
  • Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) - RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act) is a law enacted in the United Kingdom in 2000 to govern the interception and use of electronic communications.
  • Remote Python Call (RPyC) - A remote python call (RPyC) is a type of remote procedure call that allows an administrator to use the universality of Python programming language to manage a remote object as if it were local.
  • remote wipe - Remote wipe is a security feature that allows a network administrator or device owner to send a command that deletes data to a computing device.
  • Report on Compliance (ROC) - A Report on Compliance (ROC) is a form that must be completed by all Level 1 Visa merchants undergoing a PCI DSS audit.
  • RFID virus - An RFID (radio-frequency identification) virus is malicious code inserted into an RFID tag to alter or corrupt data in an RFID system.
  • Rijndael - Rijndael (pronounced rain-dahl) is the algorithm that has been selected by the U.
  • risk assessment framework (RAF) - A risk assessment framework (RAF) is a strategy for prioritizing and sharing information about the security risks to an information technology (IT) infrastructure.
  • rogue employee - A rogue employee is a worker who undermines the organization that employs him by failing to comply with its business rules and policies.
  • role mining - Role mining is the process of analyzing user-to-resource mapping data to determine or modify user permissions for role-based access control (RBAC) in an enterprise.
  • role-based access control (RBAC) - Role-based access control (RBAC) is a method of restricting network access based on the roles of individual users within an enterprise.
  • rootkit - A rootkit is a program or a collection of malicious software tools that give a threat actor remote access to and control over a computer or other system.
  • RSA algorithm (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) - The RSA algorithm is the basis of a cryptosystem -- a suite of cryptographic algorithms that are used for specific security services or purposes -- which enables public key encryption and is widely used to secure sensitive data, particularly when it is being sent over an insecure network such as the internet.
  • RSA Security - RSA Security is a United States-based organization that creates encryption, network and computer security products.
  • S-HTTP (Secure HTTP) - S-HTTP (Secure HTTP) is an extension to the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that allows the secure exchange of files on the World Wide Web.
  • salt - In password protection, salt is a random string of data used to modify a password hash.
  • Same Origin Policy (SOP) - The Same Origin Policy (SOP), also called Single Origin Policy, is a security measure used in Web browser programming languages such as JavaScript and Ajax to protect the confidentiality and integrity of information.
  • SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language) - The Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) is an open standard for sharing security information about identity, authentication and authorization across different systems.
  • screened subnet (triple-homed firewall) - A screened subnet (also known as a 'triple-homed firewall') is a network architecture that uses a single firewall with three network interfaces.
  • script kiddy (or script kiddie) - Script kiddy (sometimes spelled kiddie) is a derogative term, originated by the more sophisticated crackers of computer security systems, for the more immature, but unfortunately often just as dangerous exploiter of security lapses on the Internet.
  • Seclore Technology (Seclore) - Seclore Technology is a Mumbai-based security software company incubated by the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Bombay.
  • SecOps - SecOps is a management approach that connects security and operations teams, similar to how DevOps unifies software developers and operations professionals.
  • Secure Electronic Transaction (SET) - Secure Electronic Transaction (SET) is a system and electronic protocol to ensure the integrity and security of transactions conducted over the internet.
  • Secure File Transfer Protocol (SSH File Transfer Protocol) - SFTP is a term that refers to either Secure File Transfer Protocol or SSH File Transfer Protocol, and is a computing network protocol for accessing and managing files on remote systems.
  • Secure Shell (SSH) - SSH, also known as Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell, is a network protocol that gives users, particularly system administrators, a secure way to access a computer over an unsecured network.
  • Security Accounts Manager (SAM) - The Security Accounts Manager (SAM) is a database in the Windows operating system (OS) that contains user names and passwords.
  • security analytics - Security analytics is an approach to cybersecurity that uses data collection, data aggregation and analysis tools for threat detection and security monitoring.
  • Security as a Service (SaaS) - Security-as-a-service (SaaS) is an outsourcing model for security management.
  • security audit - A security audit is a systematic evaluation of the security of a company's information system by measuring how well it conforms to an established set of criteria.
  • security awareness training - Security awareness training is a formal process for educating employees about corporate policies and procedures for working with information technology (IT).
  • security clearance - A security clearance is an authorization that allows access to information that would otherwise be forbidden.
  • security event - A security event is a change in the everyday operations of a network or IT service, indicating that an security policy may have been violated or a security safeguard may have failed.
  • security identifier (SID) - In Windows NT and 2000 operating systems, the security identifier (SID) is a unique alphanumeric character string that identifies each operating system and each user in a network of NT/2000 systems.
  • security incident - A security incident is an event that may indicate that an organization's systems or data have been compromised or that measures put in place to protect them have failed.
  • security information and event management (SIEM) - Security information and event management (SIEM) is an approach to security management that combines SIM (security information management) and SEM (security event management) functions into one security management system.
  • security information management (SIM) - Security information management (SIM) is the practice of collecting, monitoring and analyzing security-related data from computer logs.
  • security intelligence (SI) - Security intelligence (SI) is the information relevant to protecting an organization from external and inside threats as well as the processes, policies and tools designed to gather and analyze that information.
  • security operations center (SOC) - A security operations center (SOC) is a command center facility for a team of IT professionals with expertise in information security who monitors, analyzes and protects an organization from cyber attacks.
  • security policy - A security policy is a document that states in writing how a company plans to protect its physical and information technology (IT) assets.
  • security theater - Security theater includes any measures taken by a company or security team to create an atmosphere of safety that may only achieve the appearance of heightened security.
  • security through minority - Security through minority is an approach that relies upon infrequently-used code for its effectiveness.
  • security through obscurity - Security through obscurity (STO) is reliance upon secrecy in software development to minimize the chance that weaknesses may be detected and targeted.
  • security through obsolescence - Security through obsolescence is the use of obsolete technologies whose vulnerabilities are no longer well known among the public.
  • security token - A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a login process.
  • Security, Trust and Assurance Registry (STAR) - The Security, Trust and Assurance Registry (STAR) is an online registry of cloud provider security controls.
  • segregation of duties (SoD) - Segregation of duties (SoD) is an internal control designed to prevent error and fraud by ensuring that at least two individuals are responsible for the separate parts of any task.
  • Sender Policy Framework (SPF) - Sender Policy Framework (SPF) is an anti-spam approach in which the Internet domain of an e-mail sender can be authenticated for that sender, thereby discouraging spam mailers, who routinely disguise the origin of their e-mail, a practice known as e-mail spoofing.
  • sensitive information - Sensitive information is data that must be protected from unauthorized access to safeguard the privacy or security of an individual or organization.
  • Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) - The Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) is a policing agency dedicated to the identification of criminal activity related to drug trafficking, money laundering, identity theft and immigration.
  • session ID - A session ID is a unique number that a Web site's server assigns to identify a specific user for the duration of that user's visit (session).
  • session key - A session key is an encryption and decryption key that is randomly generated to ensure the security of a communications session between a user and another computer or between two computers.
  • shadow app - A shadow app is a software program that is not supported by an employee's information technology (IT) department.
  • shadow IT - Shadow IT is hardware or software that is not supported by an organization's IT department.
  • shadow password file - A shadow password file, also known as /etc/shadow, is a system file in Linux that stores encrypted user passwords and is accessible only to the root user, preventing unauthorized users or malicious actors from breaking into the system.
  • Shared Key Authentication (SKA) - Shared Key Authentication (SKA) is a process by which a computer can gain access to a wireless network that uses the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) protocol.
  • shared responsibility model - A shared responsibility model is a cloud security framework that dictates the security obligations of a cloud computing provider and its users to ensure accountability.
  • shoulder surfing - Shoulder surfing is using direct observation techniques, such as looking over someone's shoulder, to get information.
  • single sign-on (SSO) - Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials -- for example, a name and password -- to access multiple applications.
  • single-factor authentication (SFA) - Single-factor authentication (SFA) is the traditional security process that requires a user name and password before granting access to the user.
SearchCompliance
  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk avoidance

    Risk avoidance is the elimination of hazards, activities and exposures that can negatively affect an organization and its assets.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud archive

    A cloud archive is storage as a service for long-term data retention.

  • cache

    A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing ...

  • archive

    An archive is a collection of data moved to a repository for long-term retention, to keep separate for compliance reasons or for ...

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