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Wireless LANs

Terms related to wireless LANs, including definitions about Wi-Fi and words and phrases about wireless access points, wireless controllers, wireless LAN security and WLAN configuration.

802 - WIR

  • 802.11 - 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.11ac (Gigabit Wi-Fi) - 802.11ac, also known as Gigabit Wi-Fi, is a proposed specification in the 802.
  • 802.11d - 802.11d is a communications specification for use in countries where systems using other standards in the 802.
  • 802.11h - The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11n - 802.11n is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11u - 802.11u is an amendment to the IEEE 802.
  • 802.11x - 802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.
  • Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) - The Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) is a query and response protocol that defines services offered by an access point (AP), typically at a Wi-Fi hot spot.
  • antenna - An antenna is a specialized transducer that converts radio-frequency (RF) fields into alternating current (AC) or vice-versa.
  • bandwidth (network bandwidth) - Network bandwidth is a measurement indicating the maximum capacity of a wired or wireless communications link to transmit data over a network connection in a given amount of time.
  • beamforming - Beamforming is a type of radio frequency (RF) management in which a wireless signal is directed toward a specific receiving device.
  • CAPWAP (Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points) - CAPWAP (Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points) is a standardized protocol that enables wireless LAN (WLAN) controllers to centrally manage a group of wireless access points (APs).
  • cognitive radio (CR) - Cognitive radio (CR) is a form of wireless communication in which a transceiver can intelligently detect which communication channels are in use and which ones are not.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • dead zone (Wi-Fi dead zone) - A dead zone (Wi-Fi dead zone) is an area within a wireless LAN location where Wi-Fi does not function, typically due to radio interference or range issues.
  • distributed antenna system (DAS) - A distributed antenna system (DAS) is a way to deal with isolated spots of poor coverage inside a large building by installing a network of relatively small antennas throughout the building to serve as repeaters.
  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) - Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks.
  • evil twin - An evil twin, in security, is a rogue wireless access point that masquerades as a legitimate hot spot.
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) - The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands the authentication methods used by the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), a protocol often used when connecting a computer to the internet.
  • Firesheep - Firesheep is a Firefox plug-in that automates session hijacking attacks over unsecured Wi-Fi networks.
  • fixed wireless - Fixed wireless networking refers to the operation of wireless devices in fixed locations such as homes and offices.
  • frequency jammer - Frequency jamming is the disruption of radio signals through use of an over-powered signal in the same frequency range.
  • geolocation - Geolocation is the detection of the physical location of an Internet connected computing device.
  • hybrid WAN - A hybrid WAN is a wide area network that sends traffic over two or more connection types.
  • IEEE 802 wireless standards - The IEEE 802 standard is a collection of networking standards that cover the physical and data-link layer specifications for technologies such as Ethernet and wireless.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • IoT security (internet of things security) - IoT security is the technology segment focused on safeguarding connected devices and networks in the internet of things (IoT).
  • IR wireless (infrared wireless) - IR wireless is the use of wireless technology in devices or systems that convey data through infrared (IR) radiation.
  • line of sight (LOS) - The level of obstruction in a line of sight determines not only the visibility from one point to another but also the quality of signal reception for wireless transmissions, such as Wi-Fi.
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • microwave - The term microwave refers to electromagnetic energy having a frequency higher than 1 gigahertz (billions of cycles per second), corresponding to wavelength shorter than 30 centimeters.
  • MiFi - MiFi is a portable broadband device that allows multiple end users and mobile devices to share a 3G or 4G mobile broadband Internet connection and create an ad-hoc network.
  • MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) - MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both the source (transmitter) and the destination (receiver).
  • MISO (multiple input, single output) - MISO (multiple input, single output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the source (transmitter).
  • mobile hotspot - A mobile hotspot is an ad hoc wireless access point that is created by a dedicated hardware device or a smartphone feature that shares the phone's cellular data.
  • mobile security (wireless security) - Mobile security is the protection of smartphones, tablets, laptops and other portable computing devices, and the networks they connect to, from threats and vulnerabilities associated with wireless computing.
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) - Near Field Communication (NFC) is a short-range wireless connectivity standard (Ecma-340, ISO/IEC 18092) that uses magnetic field induction to enable communication between devices when they're touched together, or brought within a few centimeters of each other.
  • network slicing - Network slicing overlays multiple virtual networks on top of a shared network.
  • OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) - The One Laptop Per Child project (OLPC) is an initiative aimed at providing inexpensive laptop computers to children in the developing world as a means of bridging the digital divide.
  • PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) - PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) is a version of EAP, the authentication protocol used in wireless networks and Point-to-Point connections.
  • piggybacking - Piggybacking, in a wireless communications context, is the unauthorized use of a wireless LAN.
  • push voice - Push Voice is a service that enables functionality normally associated with PBX-based phone systems for cellular phones or other mobile handsets.
  • QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) - QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) is a method of combining two amplitude modulation (AM) signals into a single channel.
  • radio frequency (RF, rf) - Radio frequency (RF) is a measurement representing the oscillation rate of electromagnetic radiation spectrum, or electromagnetic radio waves, from frequencies ranging from 300 GHz to as low as 9 kHz.
  • single stream 802.11n - Single-stream 802.
  • SIP trunking (Session Initiation Protocol trunking) - Session Initiation Protocol trunking is a service offered by a communications service provider that uses the protocol to provision voice over IP connectivity between an on-premises phone system and the public switched telephone network.
  • star network - A star network is a local area network (LAN) topology in which all nodes -- personal computers (PCs), workstations or other devices -- are directly connected to a common central computer that is often referred to as a hub.
  • Sugar - Sugar is a graphical user interface GUI developed for the $100 laptop (XO).
  • TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) - TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) is an encryption protocol included as part of the IEEE 802.
  • transponder - A transponder is a wireless communications, monitoring, or control device that picks up and automatically responds to an incoming signal.
  • VPN (virtual private network) - A virtual private network (VPN) is a service that creates a safe, encrypted online connection.
  • WAN (wide area network) - A wide area network (WAN) is a geographically distributed telecommunications network that interconnects multiple local area networks (LANs).
  • WAPI (WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure) - WAPI (WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure) is the wireless local area network (WLAN) standard officially supported by the Chinese state government.
  • war driving (access point mapping) - War driving, also called access point mapping, is the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or elsewhere.
  • WAX (Wireless Abstract XML) - Wireless Abstract XML (WAX) is an abstract markup language and associated tools that facilitate wireless application development.
  • White Space Wi-Fi (White-Fi) - White space Wi-Fi, also known as White-Fi, specified in IEEE 802.
  • Wi-Fi (802.11x standard) - Wi-Fi is the popular term for high-frequency wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and a standard that has gained acceptance in many companies as an alternative to a wired LAN.
  • Wi-Fi Alliance - The Wi-Fi Alliance is a wireless industry organization that exists to promote wireless technologies and interoperability.
  • Wi-Fi finder (Wi-Fi signal finder, Wi-Fi seeker or Wi-Fi locator) - A Wi-Fi finder, also called a Wi-Fi signal finder, Wi-Fi seeker or Wi-Fi locator, is a miniature electronic device that can determine whether or not a portable computer user is within range of an access point for a wireless local area network (WLAN).
  • Wi-Fi HaLow (802.11ah) - HaLow is based on the WiFi Alliance 802.
  • Wi-Fi Pineapple - A Wi-Fi Pineapple is a wireless auditing platform from Hak5 that allows network security administrators to conduct penetration tests.
  • Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) - Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) is a security standard for computing devices equipped with wireless internet connections.
  • Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) - Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol, specified in the IEEE Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) standard, 802.
  • wireless - Wireless is a term used to define telecommunication and data transmission without wires.
  • wireless ad hoc network (WANET) - A wireless ad hoc network (WANET) is a type of local area network (LAN) that is built spontaneously to enable two or more wireless devices to be connected to each other without requiring typical network infrastructure equipment, such as a wireless router or access point.
  • Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) - Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) is a specification for a set of communication protocols to standardize the way that wireless devices, such as cellular telephones and radio transceivers, can be used for internet access, including email, the web, newsgroups and instant messaging.
  • wireless broadband (WiBB) - Wireless broadband (WiBB) is high-speed internet and data service delivered through a wireless local area network (WLAN) or wireless wide area network (WWAN).
  • wireless distribution system (WDS) - A wireless distribution system (WDS) is a method of interconnecting access points (AP) in a wireless local area network (WLAN).
  • wireless fidelity - Wireless fidelity is frequently thought to be the full version of Wi-Fi, which refers to any of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 802.
  • wireless ISP (wireless Internet service provider or WISP) - A wireless Internet service provider (WISP) is an Internet service provider (ISP) that allows subscribers to connect to a server at designated hot spots (access points) using a wireless connection such as Wi-Fi.
  • wireless mesh network (WMN) - A wireless mesh network (WMN) is a mesh network created through the connection of wireless access point (WAP) nodes installed at each network user's locale.
  • Wireless Transport Layer Security (WTLS) - Wireless Transport Layer Security (WTLS) is the security level for Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) applications.
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