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Wireless technologies

Terms related to wireless technologies, including definitions about wireless devices and words and phrases about radio, microwave and infrared communication.

2.5 - MPO

  • 2.5G - 2.5G describes the state of wireless technology and capability usually associated with General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) - that is, between the second and third generations of wireless technology.
  • 3G (third generation of mobile telephony) - 3G refers to the third generation of cellular technology that enables mobile telephony.
  • 3G card - A 3G card is a modem that allows a computing device to access the Internet wirelessly through a cellular provider's 3G network.
  • 5G new radio (NR) - 5G new radio (5G NR) is a set of standards that replaces the LTE 4G wireless network communications standard.
  • 802.11 - 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.11ac (Gigabit Wi-Fi) - 802.11ac, also known as Gigabit Wi-Fi, is a proposed specification in the 802.
  • 802.11h - The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11u - 802.11u is an amendment to the IEEE 802.
  • 802.11x - 802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.
  • 802.15 - 802.15 is a communications specification that was approved in early 2002 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) for wireless personal area networks (WPANs).
  • 802.16c - 802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.
  • Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) - The Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) is a query and response protocol that defines services offered by an access point (AP), typically at a Wi-Fi hot spot.
  • acoustical mesh network - An acoustical mesh network is a decentralized communication system that transmits data by using sound to connect computers.
  • airplane mode - Airplane mode is a setting on cell phones, smartphones and other mobile communication devices that prevents the device from sending or receiving calls and text messages.
  • Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) - Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) is a broad set of technologies used to collect information from an object, image or sound without manual data entry.
  • base station - In telecommunications, a base station is a fixed transceiver that is the main communication point for one or more wireless mobile client devices.
  • Bluetooth - Bluetooth is a telecommunications industry specification that describes how mobile devices, computers and other devices can easily communicate with each other using a short-range wireless connection.
  • Bluetooth 2.0+EDR - Bluetooth 2.
  • Bluetooth 4.0 - Bluetooth 4.
  • Bluetooth brick - A Bluetooth brick is a battery-powered, sealed device that has sensors for monitoring and communicating information such as temperature or vibration levels.
  • Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) - Also marketed as Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth LE was introduced in the Bluetooth 4.
  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) - BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) - The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas.
  • broadcast - In general, to broadcast (verb) is to cast or throw forth something in all directions at the same time.
  • carrier-to-noise ratio - In communications, the carrier-to-noise ratio, often written as CNR or C/N, is a measure of the received carrier strength relative to the strength of the received noise.
  • CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) - CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) refers to any of several protocols used in second-generation (2G) and third-generation (3G) wireless communications.
  • cell phone jammer - A cell phone jammer is a device that blocks transmission or reception of signals, usually by creating some form of interference at the same frequency ranges that cell phones use.
  • circuit - In electronics, a circuit is a path between two or more points along which an electrical current can be carried.
  • Citrix X1 Mouse - The Citrix X1 Mouse is a small Bluetooth device that allows users to navigate Windows virtual desktops and applications on mobile devices.
  • cloud printing - Cloud printing is a service that lets users print from any device on a network.
  • cloud radio access network (C-RAN) - C-RAN, or cloud radio access network, is a centralized, cloud computing-based architecture for radio access networks (RAN) that enables large-scale deployment, collaborative radio technology support and real time virtualization capabilities.
  • coaxial antenna - A coaxial antenna is a variant of the dipole antenna, designed for use with an unbalanced feed line.
  • coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (COFDM) - Coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (COFDM) is a telecommunications modulation scheme that divides a single digital signal across 1,000 or more signal carriers simultaneously.
  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) - CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.
  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) - Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.
  • dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) - Dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) is a wireless communication technology designed to allow automobiles in the intelligent transportation system (ITS) to communicate with other automobiles or infrastructure technology.
  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB) - .
  • digital wallet - A digital wallet is a software application that serves as an electronic version of a physical wallet, digitizing credit and debit card information to enable consumers to make purchases from their smartphones.
  • discontinuous transmission (DTX) - Discontinuous transmission (DTX) is a method of momentarily powering-down, or muting, a mobile or portable wireless telephone set when there is no voice input to the set.
  • distributed antenna system (DAS) - A distributed antenna system (DAS) is a way to deal with isolated spots of poor coverage inside a large building by installing a network of relatively small antennas throughout the building to serve as repeaters.
  • downlink and uplink - These terms should not be confused with downstream and upstream.
  • dual Wi-Fi antenna - A dual Wi-Fi antenna is a pair of identical antennas on a wireless router or Wi-Fi-equipped device, intended to eliminate signal fading and dead spots.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) - Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks.
  • Evernet - The term Evernet has been used to describe the convergence of wireless, broadband, and Internet telephony technologies that will result in the ability to be continuously connected to the Web anywhere using virtually any information device.
  • Evolved Packet Core (EPC) - Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a flat architecture that provides a converged voice and data networking framework to connect users on a Long-Term Evolutio (LTE) network.
  • FDMA (frequency division multiple access) - .
  • feed line - In a wireless communications or broadcasting antenna system, the feed line connects the antenna to the receiver, transmitter, or transceiver.
  • FeliCa - .
  • fixed wireless - Fixed wireless networking refers to the operation of wireless devices in fixed locations such as homes and offices.
  • FlashMob supercomputer - A FlashMob supercomputer is a group of computer enthusiasts who gather together in one physical location for a brief time period in order to function as a supercomputer and work on a single problem.
  • foreign agent - In Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a foreign agent is a router serving as a mobility agent for a mobile node.
  • foreign network - In the Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a foreign network is any network other than the home network to which a mobile device may be connected.
  • free-space optics (FSO) - Free-space optics (FSO), also called free-space photonics (FSP), refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain broadband communications.
  • frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) - Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) transmission is the repeated switching of the carrier frequency during radio transmission to reduce interference and avoid interception.
  • fronthaul - Fronthaul, also known as mobile fronthaul, is a term that refers to the fiber-based connection of the cloud radio access network (C-RAN), a new type of cellular network architecture of centralized baseband units (BBUs) and remote radio heads (RRHs) at the access layer of the network.
  • geo-fencing (geofencing) - Geo-fencing is a feature in a software program that uses the global positioning system (GPS) or radio frequency identification (RFID) to define geographical boundaries.
  • geolocation - Geolocation is the detection of the physical location of an Internet connected computing device.
  • Global Positioning System (GPS) - The GPS (Global Positioning System) is a 'constellation' of approximately 30 well-spaced satellites that orbit the Earth and make it possible for people with ground receivers to pinpoint their geographic location.
  • GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) - GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) is a satellite system that is used to pinpoint the geographic location of a user's receiver anywhere in the world.
  • Google Fi - Google Fi is virtual carrier network service for pervasive Wi-Fi.
  • GPRS (General Packet Radio Services) - General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) is a best-effort packet-switching protocol for wireless and cellular network communication services.
  • harmonic - A harmonic is a wave or signal whose frequency is an integral (whole number) multiple of the frequency of the same reference signal or wave.
  • high availability (HA) - High availability (HA) is the ability of a system to operate continuously without failing for a designated period of time.
  • home agent - In Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a home agent is a router on a mobile node's home network that maintains information about the device's current location, as identified in its care-of address.
  • Home Location Register (HLR) - The Home Location Register (HLR) is the main database of permanent subscriber information for a mobile network.
  • HomeRF (home radio frequency) - HomeRF (for home radio frequency) is a home networking standard developed by Proxim Inc.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • Hot Spot 2.0 (HS 2.0) - Hot Spot 2.0 (HS 2.
  • HSPA (high speed packet access) - HSPA (high speed packet access) is a third-generation (3G) mobile broadband communications technology.
  • IEEE 802 wireless standards - The IEEE 802 standard is a collection of networking standards that cover the physical and data-link layer specifications for technologies such as Ethernet and wireless.
  • inductive charging - Inductive charging is a wireless charging method used for charging mid-sized items such as cell phones, MP3 players and PDAs.
  • infrared transmission - Infrared transmission refers to energy in the region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum at wavelength s longer than those of visible light, but shorter than those of radio.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • IP PBX (private branch exchange) - An IP PBX is a private branch exchange (telephone switching system within an enterprise) that switches calls between VoIP (voice over Internet Protocol or IP) users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines.
  • iPad - The iPad is a touchscreen tablet PC made by Apple.
  • iPhone Configuration Utility - The iPhone Configuration Utility is free software for Windows and Mac OS X that lets an administrator control how an iOS device works within an enterprise IT network.
  • IR wireless (infrared wireless) - IR wireless is the use of wireless technology in devices or systems that convey data through infrared (IR) radiation.
  • J2ME (Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition) - J2ME (Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition) is a technology that allows programmers to use the Java programming language and related tools to develop programs for mobile wireless information devices such as cellular phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs).
  • Lidar - Lidar typically uses a low-power, eye-safe pulsing laser working in conjunction with a camera.
  • LiFi - LiFi is a wireless optical networking technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for data transmission.
  • location awareness - Location awareness is a component of presence technology that delivers information about a device's physical location to another user or application.
  • location-based service (LBS) - A location-based service (LBS) is a software application for a mobile device that requires knowledge about where the mobile device is located.
  • LPWAN (low-power wide area network) - Low-power WAN (LPWAN) is a wireless wide area network technology that interconnects low-bandwidth, battery-powered devices with low bit rates over long ranges.
  • LTE (Long-Term Evolution) - LTE (Long-Term Evolution) is a standard for 4G wireless technology that offers increased network capacity and speed for cellphones and other cellular devices compared with 3G.
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • MiFi - MiFi is a portable broadband device that allows multiple end users and mobile devices to share a 3G or 4G mobile broadband Internet connection and create an ad-hoc network.
  • MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) - MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both the source (transmitter) and the destination (receiver).
  • MISO (multiple input, single output) - MISO (multiple input, single output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the source (transmitter).
  • mobile application processor - A mobile application processor is a system on a chip (SoC) designed to support applications running in a mobile operating system environment such as Android, Apple iOS, Windows CE/Mobile or Symbian.
  • mobile computing (nomadic computing) - Mobile computing is the use of portable computing devices in conjunction with mobile technology that enables users to access the internet and data on mobile devices anytime, anywhere.
  • mobile hotspot - A mobile hotspot is an ad hoc wireless access point that is created by a dedicated hardware device or a smartphone feature that shares the phone's cellular data.
  • mobile Internet device (MID) - The mobile Internet device (MID) is a mini-tablet communications unit aimed at the consumer market and designed to provide entertainment, information and location-based services.
  • Mobile IP - Mobile IP is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard communications protocol that is designed to allow mobile device users to move from one network to another while maintaining their permanent IP address.
  • Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6 or Mobile Internet Protocol version 6) - Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is a protocol developed as a subset of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to support mobile connections.
  • mobile middleware - Mobile middleware is software that connects disparate mobile applications, programs and systems.
  • mobile operating system - A mobile operating system (OS) is software that allows smartphones, tablet PCs (personal computers) and other devices to run applications and programs.
  • Morphis - Morphis is a Java -based open source wireless transcoding platform from Kargo, Inc.
  • mPOS (mobile point of sale) - An mPOS (mobile point-of-sale) is a smartphone, tablet or dedicated wireless device that performs the functions of a cash register or electronic point-of-sale terminal (POS terminal) wirelessly.
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