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Wireless technologies

Terms related to wireless technologies, including definitions about wireless devices and words and phrases about radio, microwave and infrared communication.

2.5 - GEO

  • 2.5G - 2.5G describes the state of wireless technology and capability usually associated with General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) - that is, between the second and third generations of wireless technology.
  • 3G (third generation of mobile telephony) - 3G refers to the third generation of mobile telephony (that is, cellular) technology.
  • 3G card - A 3G card is a modem that allows a computing device to access the Internet wirelessly through a cellular provider's 3G network.
  • 5G - Fifth-generation wireless (5G) is the latest iteration of cellular technology, engineered to greatly increase the speed and responsiveness of wireless networks.
  • 5G NR (new radio) - 5G NR (new radio) is a set of standards that replace the LTE network 4G wireless communications standard.
  • 802.11 - 802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.11a - 802.11a is one of several specifications in the 802.
  • 802.11ac (Gigabit Wi-Fi) - 802.11ac, also known as Gigabit Wi-Fi, is a proposed specification in the 802.
  • 802.11ad - 802.11ad, also called WiGig 1.
  • 802.11b - The 802.11b standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) - often called Wi-Fi - is part of the 802.
  • 802.11g - The 802.11g specification is a standard for wireless local area networks WLANs) that offers wireless transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps), compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum with the earlier 802.
  • 802.11h - The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.
  • 802.11j - The 802.11j specification is a proposed addition to the 802.
  • 802.11k - 802.11k is a proposed standard for a series of measurement requests and reports involving channel selection, roaming, transmit power control (TPC), and subscriber statistics in 802.
  • 802.11m - 802.11m is an initiative to perform editorial maintenance, corrections, improvements, clarifications, and interpretations relevant to documentation for 802.
  • 802.11u - 802.11u is an amendment to the IEEE 802.
  • 802.11x - 802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.
  • 802.15 - 802.15 is a communications specification that was approved in early 2002 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) for wireless personal area networks (WPANs).
  • 802.16 - 802.16 is a group of broadband wireless communications standards for metropolitan area networks (MANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
  • 802.16a - 802.16a is a wireless communications specification for metropolitan area networks (MANs).
  • 802.16c - 802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.
  • 802.1X - The 802.1X standard is designed to enhance the security of wireless local area networks (WLANs) that follow the IEEE 802.
  • Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) - The Access Network Query Protocol (ANQP) is a query and response protocol that defines services offered by an access point (AP), typically at a Wi-Fi hot spot.
  • access point base station - Access point base station is the original term for what is now known as a femtocell.
  • acoustical mesh network - An acoustical mesh network is a decentralized communication system that transmits data by using sound to connect computers.
  • ad-hoc network - An ad-hoc network is a local area network (LAN) that is built spontaneously as devices connect.
  • air interface - In cellular telephone communications, the air interface is the radio-frequency portion of the circuit between the cellular phone set or wireless modem (usually portable or mobile) and the active base station.
  • airplane mode - Airplane mode is a setting on cell phones, smartphones and other mobile communication devices that prevents the device from sending or receiving calls and text messages.
  • appliance computing - Appliance computing is an Internet-based computing architecture where software applications reside on a Web server rather than on the end-user's workstation.
  • Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) - Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) is a broad set of technologies used to collect information from an object, image or sound without manual data entry.
  • beaming - In infrared transmission, beaming is the communication of data between wireless devices using a beam of infrared light.
  • Berrycasting - Berrycasting is broadcasting audio or video content to a Blackberry wireless device equipped with media player software by means of the RIM network.
  • Bluejacking - Bluejacking is the practice of sending messages between mobile users using a Bluetooth wireless connection.
  • Bluetooth - Bluetooth technology allows computers, mobile devices and accessories to easily interconnect with each other.
  • Bluetooth 2.0+EDR - Bluetooth 2.
  • Bluetooth 4.0 - Bluetooth 4.
  • Bluetooth brick - A Bluetooth brick is a battery-powered, sealed device that has sensors for monitoring and communicating information such as temperature or vibration levels.
  • Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) - Also marketed as Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth LE was introduced in the Bluetooth 4.
  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) - BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) - The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas.
  • broadcast - In general, to broadcast (verb) is to cast or throw forth something in all directions at the same time.
  • Bump - Bump is a free software program (app) that allows two phones to transfer contact information when the phone owners "bump" hands.
  • CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) - CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) refers to any of several protocols used in second-generation (2G) and third-generation (3G) wireless communications.
  • CDMA One (cdmaOne or code-division multiple access one) - Also see CDMA, WCDMA, and CDMA2000.
  • CDMA2000 (IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or code-division multiple access 2000) - CDMA2000, also known as IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or 1xRTT, is a code-division multiple access (CDMA) version of the IMT-2000 standard developed by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
  • cell - In wireless telephony, a cell is the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter.
  • cell breathing - Cell breathing is the constant change of the range of the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter based on the amount of traffic currently using that transmitter.
  • cell phone jammer - A cell phone jammer is a device that blocks transmission or reception of signals, usually by creating some form of interference at the same frequency ranges that cell phones use.
  • cellspace - According to writer David S.
  • cellular telephone (mobile telephone) - Cellular telephone, sometimes called mobile telephone, is a type of short-wave analog or digital telecommunication in which a subscriber has a wireless connection from a mobile telephone to a relatively nearby transmitter.
  • Centrino - Centrino is a technology package from Intel that provides built-in wireless support for laptop computers while making it possible to run a laptop all day (up to seven hours) without a battery recharge.
  • chucking - In computer and telephone use, chucking is the process of discarding a small piece of hardware by violent means, such as hurling it out a window, against a wall, or into a body of water.
  • circuit - In electronics, a circuit is a path between two or more points along which an electrical current can be carried.
  • Citrix X1 Mouse - The Citrix X1 Mouse is a small Bluetooth device that allows users to navigate Windows virtual desktops and applications on mobile devices.
  • cloud printing - Cloud printing is a service that lets users print from any device on a network.
  • cloud radio access network (C-RAN) - C-RAN, or cloud radio access network, is a centralized, cloud computing-based architecture for radio access networks (RAN) that enables large-scale deployment, collaborative radio technology support and real time virtualization capabilities.
  • coaxial antenna - A coaxial antenna is a variant of the dipole antenna, designed for use with an unbalanced feed line.
  • COFDM - COFDM is a modulation scheme that divides a single digital signal across 1,000 or more signal carriers simultaneously.
  • Compact HTML (CHTML) - Compact HTML (CHTML or cHTML) is a subset of standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) adapted for use with small computing devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), cellular phones, and smartphones.
  • CrackBerry - CrackBerry is a nickname for the BlackBerry handheld device.
  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) - CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.
  • CULV (consumer ultra-low voltage) - CULV (consumer ultra-low voltage) is a line of Intel processors for ultra-light notebook computers.
  • D-AMPS (Digital-Advanced Mobile Phone Service) - D-AMPS (Digital-Advanced Mobile Phone Service), sometimes spelled DAMPS, is a digital version of AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone Service), the original analog standard for cellular telephone phone service in the United States.
  • datacard - A datacard is any removable computer component, approximately the size of a credit card, that contains data, or that contains nonvolatile memory to which data can be written and from which data can be recovered.
  • decibels related to dipole antenna (dBd) - dBd (decibels related to dipole antenna) is a measure of the gain of an antenna system relative to a dipole antenna at radio frequency.
  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) - Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.
  • dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) - Dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) is a wireless communication technology designed to allow automobiles in the intelligent transportation system (ITS) to communicate with other automobiles or infrastructure technology.
  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB) - .
  • digital wallet - A digital wallet is a software application that serves as an electronic version of a physical wallet, digitizing credit and debit card information to enable consumers to make purchases from their smartphones.
  • discontinuous transmission (DTX) - Discontinuous transmission (DTX) is a method of momentarily powering-down, or muting, a mobile or portable wireless telephone set when there is no voice input to the set.
  • distributed antenna system (DAS) - A distributed antenna system (DAS) is a way to deal with isolated spots of poor coverage inside a large building by installing a network of relatively small antennas throughout the building to serve as repeaters.
  • DoCoMo (NTT DoCoMo) - DoCoMo, also known as NTT DoCoMo, is a Japanese communications corporation that has introduced a line of cell phone sets that contain the equivalent of a digital smart card.
  • DoPa (DoCoMo Packet Transmission) - DoPa (DoCoMo Packet Transmission) is a packet-switched network service developed by NTT DoCoMo in Japan for Internet connection from mobile devices.
  • downlink and uplink - These terms should not be confused with downstream and upstream.
  • dual Wi-Fi antenna - A dual Wi-Fi antenna is a pair of identical antennas on a wireless router or Wi-Fi-equipped device, intended to eliminate signal fading and dead spots.
  • E.164 - E.164 is an international numbering plan for public telephone systems in which each assigned number contains a country code (CC), a national destination code (NDC), and a subscriber number (SN).
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment) - EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment) is a faster version of GSM designed to deliver data at rates up to 384 Kbps and enable the delivery of multimedia and other broadband applications to mobile phone and computer users.
  • ELF (extremely low frequency) - ELF (extremely low frequency) refers to an electromagnetic field having a frequency much lower than the frequencies of signals typically used in communications.
  • Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) - Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) is an adaptation of the Short Message Service (SMS) that allows users to send and receive ring tones and operator logos, as well as combinations of simple media to and from EMS-compliant handsets.
  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) - Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks.
  • EPOC - EPOC is an operating system designed for small, portable computer-telephones with wireless access to phone and other information services.
  • ESMR (Enhanced Specialized Mobile Radio) - Also see Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR).
  • ETRN (Extended Turn) - ETRN (Extended Turn) is an extension to the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) that allows an SMTP server to send a request to another SMTP server to send any e-mail messages it has.
  • EV-DO (1x Evolution-Data Optimized) - 1x Evolution-Data Optimized, (EV-DO) is a 3G wireless radio broadband data standard.
  • Evernet - The term Evernet has been used to describe the convergence of wireless, broadband, and Internet telephony technologies that will result in the ability to be continuously connected to the Web anywhere using virtually any information device.
  • Evolved Packet Core (EPC) - Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a flat architecture that provides a converged voice and data networking framework to connect users on a Long-Term Evolutio (LTE) network.
  • FDMA (frequency division multiple access) - .
  • feed line - In a wireless communications or broadcasting antenna system, the feed line connects the antenna to the receiver, transmitter, or transceiver.
  • FeliCa - .
  • fixed wireless - Fixed wireless refers to the operation of wireless devices or systems in fixed locations such as homes and offices.
  • FlashMob supercomputer - A FlashMob supercomputer is a group of computer enthusiasts who gather together in one physical location for a brief time period in order to function as a supercomputer and work on a single problem.
  • foreign agent - In Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a foreign agent is a router serving as a mobility agent for a mobile node.
  • foreign network - In the Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a foreign network is any network other than the home network to which a mobile device may be connected.
  • free-space optics (FSO) - Free-space optics (FSO), also called free-space photonics (FSP), refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain broadband communications.
  • frequency-hopping spread spectrum - Frequency hopping is one of two basic modulation techniques used in spread spectrum signal transmission.
  • fronthaul - Fronthaul, also known as mobile fronthaul, is a term that refers to the connection of the C-RAN, a new type of cellular network architecture of centralized baseband units (BBU), at the access layer of the network to remote standalone radio heads at cell sites.
  • geo-fencing (geofencing) - Geo-fencing is a feature in a software program that uses the global positioning system (GPS) or radio frequency identification (RFID) to define geographical boundaries.
  • geolocation - Geolocation is the detection of the physical location of an Internet connected computing device.

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