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Wireless technologies

Terms related to wireless technologies, including definitions about wireless devices and words and phrases about radio, microwave and infrared communication.

MOB - WIR

  • mobile application processor - A mobile application processor is a system on a chip (SoC) designed to support applications running in a mobile operating system environment such as Android, Apple iOS, Windows CE/Mobile or Symbian.
  • mobile computing (nomadic computing) - Mobile computing is the use of portable computing devices in conjunction with mobile technology that enables users to access the internet and data on mobile devices anytime, anywhere.
  • mobile hotspot - A mobile hotspot is an ad hoc wireless access point that is created by a dedicated hardware device or a smartphone feature that shares the phone's cellular data.
  • mobile Internet device (MID) - The mobile Internet device (MID) is a mini-tablet communications unit aimed at the consumer market and designed to provide entertainment, information and location-based services.
  • Mobile IP - Mobile IP is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard communications protocol that is designed to allow mobile device users to move from one network to another while maintaining their permanent IP address.
  • Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6 or Mobile Internet Protocol version 6) - Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is a protocol developed as a subset of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to support mobile connections.
  • mobile middleware - Mobile middleware is software that connects disparate mobile applications, programs and systems.
  • mobile operating system - A mobile operating system (OS) is software that allows smartphones, tablet PCs (personal computers) and other devices to run applications and programs.
  • Morphis - Morphis is a Java -based open source wireless transcoding platform from Kargo, Inc.
  • mPOS (mobile point of sale) - An mPOS (mobile point-of-sale) is a smartphone, tablet or dedicated wireless device that performs the functions of a cash register or electronic point-of-sale terminal (POS terminal) wirelessly.
  • multi-user MIMO - Multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO) is a wireless communication technology that uses multiple antennas to improve communication by creating multiple connections to the same device at the same time.
  • Multimedia Home Platform (MHP) - Multimedia Home Platform (MHP) is a digital video broadcasting (DVB) standard intended to combine digital television (DTV) with the Internet and the World Wide Web.
  • Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) - Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) - sometimes called Multimedia Messaging System - is a communications technology developed by 3GPP (Third Generation Partnership Project) that allows users to exchange multimedia communications between capable mobile phones and other devices.
  • netbook - A netbook is a small, light, low-power notebook computer that has less processing power than a full-sized laptop but is still suitable for word processing, running a Web browser and connecting wirelessly to the Internet.
  • network protocol - A network protocol is a set of established rules that dictate how to format, transmit and receive data so that computer network devices -- from servers and routers to endpoints -- can communicate, regardless of the differences in their underlying infrastructures, designs or standards.
  • network slicing - Network slicing overlays multiple virtual networks on top of a shared network.
  • no-swipe credit card - A no-swipe credit card is a credit card equipped with a radio frequency (RF) transponder that allows for purchases without the need for passing the card through a traditional magnetic-stripe detection machine.
  • OFDMA (orthogonal frequency-division multiple access) - Orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) is a feature of Wi-Fi 6 (802.
  • Open Handset Alliance (OHA) - The Open Handset Alliance (OHA) is a coalition of more than 30 technology and mobile companies that introduced Android, an open source mobile phone operating system.
  • Orbi Outdoor Satellite - Orbi Outdoor Satellite is a device used to extend Wi-Fi network coverage and signal strength for Netgear’s Orbi Wi-Fi router, allowing the use of mobile devices from beyond a house and into a bigger area, such as a large backyard.
  • ORTC (Object Real-Time Communications) - ORTC (object real-time communications) is an open source component of WebRTC that enables mobile endpoints to talk to servers and Web browsers with real-time communications capabilities.
  • orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) - Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a method of data transmission where a single information stream is split among several closely spaced narrowband subchannel frequencies instead of a single wideband channel frequency.
  • PCS (personal communications service) - PCS (personal communications service) is a wireless phone service similar to cellular telephone service but emphasizing personal service and extended mobility.
  • PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) - PEAP (Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol) is a version of EAP, the authentication protocol used in wireless networks and Point-to-Point connections.
  • Personal Access Communications System (PACS) - Personal Access Communications System (PACS) is a type of wireless telephone network compatible with telephone sets, answering machines, fax machines, and computers.
  • pervasive computing (ubiquitous computing) - Pervasive computing, also called ubiquitous computing, is the growing trend of embedding computational capability (generally in the form of microprocessors) into everyday objects to make them effectively communicate and perform useful tasks in a way that minimizes the end user's need to interact with computers as computers.
  • pervasive Wi-Fi - Pervasive Wi-Fi is the intercommunication of wireless networks in order to form a communications network that permeates the networked world.
  • phase-locked loop (PLL) - A phase-locked loop (PLL) is an electronic circuit with a voltage or voltage-driven oscillator that constantly adjusts to match the frequency of an input signal.
  • phased antenna system - .
  • picocell - A picocell is a small mobile base station that improves in-building cellular coverage.
  • presence leveraging - Presence leveraging refers to any technology that supports and expands presence, the ability of a network subscriber to locate and identify any other user's computing device as soon as the other user connects to the network.
  • Qi (Wireless Power Consortium) - Qi (pronounced CHEE) is a manufacturer-agnostic standard for wirelessly charging battery-powered devices.
  • Qik - Qik is an online video streaming service that allows anyone with a strong wireless Internet connection and a video camera-equipped smartphone to broadcast live events.
  • radio access network (RAN) - A radio access network (RAN) is a major component of a wireless telecommunications system that connects individual devices to other parts of a network through a radio link.
  • radio charging - Radio charging is a wireless charging method used to charge items with small batteries and low power requirements, such as watches, hearing aids and wireless keyboards and mice.
  • real-time location system (RTLS) - A real-time location system (RTLS) is one of a number of technologies used to pinpoint the current geographic position and location of a target.
  • reconfigurable tactile display (RTD) - A reconfigurable tactile display (RTD) is a control interface that provides physical touch input, but that can be configured by programming.
  • resonance charging - Resonance charging is a wireless charging method for items that require large amounts of power, such as an electric car, robot, vacuum cleaner or laptop computer.
  • ringtone - On mobile phones, a ringtone is a brief audio file played to indicate an incoming call.
  • satellite - In general, a satellite is anything that orbits something else, as, for example, the moon orbits the earth.
  • satellite Internet connection - A satellite Internet connection is an arrangement in which the upstream (outgoing) and the downstream (incoming) data are sent from, and arrive at, a computer through a satellite.
  • sensor data - Sensor data is the output of a device that detects and responds to some type of input from the physical environment.
  • sensor hub - A sensor hub is a connection point for multiple sensors that uses a multipoint control unit (MCU), coprocessor or digital signal processor (DSP) to compile and process data gathered from those sensors.
  • service set identifier (SSID) - A service set identifier (SSID) is a sequence of characters that uniquely names a wireless local area network (WLAN).
  • Short Message Service (SMS) - SMS (Short Message Service) is a service for sending short messages of up to 160 characters (224 characters if using a 5-bit mode) to mobile devices, including cell phones, smart phones and PDAs.
  • short message service center (SMSC) - A short message service center (SMSC) is the portion of a wireless network that handles SMS operations, such as routing, forwarding and storing incoming text messages on their way to desired endpoints.
  • Signaling System 7 (SS7) - Signaling System 7 (SS7) is an international telecommunication protocol standard that defines how the network elements in a public switched telephone network (PSTN) exchange information and control signals.
  • Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) - Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) is a portion of International Telecommunication Union (ITU) recommendation Q.
  • SIMO (single input, multiple output) - SIMO (single input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the destination (receiver).
  • single-user MIMO - Single-user MIMO (SU-MIMO) is a multi-transmitter and receiver technology for wireless communication that allocates the bandwidth of a wireless access point to a single device.
  • SISO (single input, single output) - SISO (single input, single output) refers to a wireless communications system in which one antenna is used at the source (transmitter) and one antenna is used at the destination (receiver).
  • small cell - A small cell is an umbrella term used to describe a miniature radio access point or wireless network base station with a low radio frequency power output, footprint and range.
  • Small Office Home Office (SOHO) - In information technology, SOHO is a term for the small office or home office environment and business culture.
  • smartphone - A smartphone is a cellular telephone with an integrated computer and other features not originally associated with telephones, such as an operating system, web browsing and the ability to run software applications.
  • SMS gateway - An SMS gateway is a website that allows users to send SMS messages from a web browser to people within the cell served by that gateway.
  • SMS spam (cell phone spam or short messaging service spam) - SMS spam (sometimes called cell phone spam) is any junk message delivered to a mobile phone as text messaging through the Short Message Service (SMS).
  • sniff subrating - Sniff subrating is a Bluetooth feature designed to increase battery life as much as 500 percent for devices whose typical usage involves a significant amount of inactive time.
  • spatial division multiple access (SDMA) - Also see frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and time division multiple access (TDMA).
  • spectrum analyzer - A spectrum analyzer is a device that measures and displays signal amplitude (strength) as it varies by frequency within its frequency range (spectrum).
  • spectrum efficiency - Spectrum efficiency describes the amount of data transmitted over a given spectrum or bandwidth with minimum transmission errors.
  • superheterodyne - Superheterodyne refers to a method of designing and building wireless communications or broadcast equipment, particularly radio receivers.
  • T1 (T-1) - Also see the T-carrier system, of which the T1 is a part.
  • talk time - In customer relationship management (CRM), talk time is the amount of time a call center agent spends with a caller during a transaction.
  • Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) - Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) is a digital modulation technique used in digital cellular telephone and mobile radio communication.
  • transceiver - A transceiver is a combination transmitter/receiver in a single package.
  • transponder - A transponder is a wireless communications, monitoring, or control device that picks up and automatically responds to an incoming signal.
  • traveling-wave tube (TWT) - A traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a specialized vacuum tube used in wireless communications, especially in satellite systems.
  • triangulation - Triangulation is a process by which the location of a radio transmitter can be determined by measuring either the radial distance, or the direction, of the received signal from two or three different points.
  • tropospheric propogation - Radio waves can propagate over the horizon when the lower atmosphere of the earth bends, scatters, and/or reflects the electromagnetic fields.
  • ultra wideband - Ultra wideband (also known as UWB or as digital pulse wireless) is a wireless technology for transmitting large amounts of digital data over a wide spectrum of frequency bands with very low power for a short distance.
  • UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service) - UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service) is a third-generation (3G) broadband, packet-based transmission of text, digitized voice, video, and multimedia at data rates up to 2 megabits per second (Mbps).
  • USSD (Unstructured Supplementary Service Data) - USSD (Unstructured Supplementary Service Data) is a GSM (Global System for Mobile) communications protocol that is used to send text messages.
  • vehicle to infrastructure (V2I or v2i) - Vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I or V2X) is a communication model that allows vehicles to share information with the components that support a country's highway system.
  • video telephony - Video telephony is full-duplex, real-time audio-visual communication between or among end users.
  • visible light communication (VLC) - Visible light communication (VLC) is the use of visible light as a method of wirelessly transmitting data.
  • VMware Horizon Mobile - VMware Horizon Mobile is mobile virtualization and application wrapping software that lets IT administrators control corporate data and applications on end users' smartphones and tablets.
  • voice activation detection (VAD) - In Voice over IP (VOiP), voice activation detection (VAD) is a software application that allows a data network carrying voice traffic over the Internet to detect the absence of audio and conserve bandwidth by preventing the transmission of "silent packets" over the network.
  • VoIP phone - A VoIP phone is a hardware- or software-based telephone designed to use voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) technology to send and receive phone calls over an IP network.
  • VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) - VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) is a satellite communications system that serves home and business users.
  • WAN (wide area network) - A wide area network (WAN) is a geographically distributed telecommunications network that interconnects multiple local area networks (LANs).
  • war driving (access point mapping) - War driving, also called access point mapping, is the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or elsewhere.
  • WAX (Wireless Abstract XML) - Wireless Abstract XML (WAX) is an abstract markup language and associated tools that facilitate wireless application development.
  • Web texting - Web texting is two-way text messaging from the Web to a handheld mobile device, usually a cellular phone.
  • What is 5G? - Fifth-generation wireless (5G) is the latest iteration of cellular technology.
  • What is 6G? Overview of 6G networks & technology - 6G (sixth-generation wireless) is the successor to 5G cellular technology.
  • white space - White space, in a communications context, refers to underutilized portions of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum vacated in the absence of analog broadcast television.
  • white space device (WSD) - A white space device is an FCC-certified wireless device that can be used without an exclusive broadcast license in the RF spectrum below 700 MHz: underutilized, unlicensed portions of the spectrum called white space.
  • White Space Wi-Fi (White-Fi) - White space Wi-Fi, also known as White-Fi, specified in IEEE 802.
  • Wi-Fi (802.11x standard) - Wi-Fi is the popular term for high-frequency wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and a standard that has gained acceptance in many companies as an alternative to a wired LAN.
  • Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - Wi-Fi 6 is a standard for wireless internet that replaces the 802.
  • Wi-Fi Alliance - The Wi-Fi Alliance is a wireless industry organization that exists to promote wireless technologies and interoperability.
  • Wi-Fi backscattering - Wi-Fi backscattering is a low-power communications technology that uses radio frequency (RF) signals as a power source and reuses the existing Wi-Fi infrastructure to provide RF-powered devices with Internet connectivity.
  • Wi-Fi calling - Wi-Fi calling is a voice service that lets users place and receive calls over a wireless internet connection, as opposed to using a cellular signal.
  • Wi-Fi HaLow (802.11ah) - HaLow is based on the WiFi Alliance 802.
  • Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) - Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) is a security standard for computing devices equipped with wireless internet connections.
  • Wi-Fi Sense - Windows Wi-Fi Sense allows Windows 10 users to get Internet access from public hotspots and private wireless local area networks (WLANs) that have been shared by friends.
  • Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) - Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is a navigation assistance system used to improve the accuracy and precision of global positioning system (GPS).
  • Windows Phone 7 - Windows Phone 7 is a Microsoft operating system for smartphones.
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