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Major IT players: How'd they start out?

Think you're a Know-IT-All when it comes to influential people in IT? Test your knowledge and see if you know what these famous geeks were doing before they made it in the big leagues.

1. Steve Case, co-founder of America Online, started his first business when he was a teenager. What was it?
a. farm stand
b. mail order company
c. computer repair business
Answer

2. Larry Ellison, co-founder of Oracle, once crafted a large-scale database for:
a. AT&T
b. CIA
c. UPS
Answer

3. Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Computer, was known in his earlier days as a:
a. politician
b. phreak
c. entertainer
Answer

4. Who manufactured oscillators for the 1939 Disney movie "Fantasia"?
a. David Packard
b. Vint Cerf
c. Dan Bricklin
Answer

5. In 1972 Bill Gates and Paul Allen created a device that:
a. recorded automobile traffic flow on a highway
b. converted English into Morse code and Morse code into English
c. prevented rear stairs in an airplane from lowering during flight
Answer

6. Apple Computer co-founder Steve Wozniak received his first license while in the sixth grade. What type of license was it?
a. pilot
b. firearms
c. ham radio
Answer

7. Grace Hopper, credited with inventing the first computer compiler, started her career as a:
a. nun
b. math teacher
c. mill worker
Answer

8. Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, has a secret talent. He is a/an:
a. expert hacker
b. professional-level pianist
c. certified sharpshooter
Answer

9. Before working for IBM, John Backus (creator of FORTRAN), attended two colleges for a short time. What did he study?
a. finance and chemistry
b. chemistry and medicine
c. English and medicine
Answer

10. Before co-founding Adobe, what company did Charles "Chuck" Geschke work for?
a. IBM
b. Enron
c. Xerox
Answer

This was last updated in November 2010
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