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Quiz: Common Vulnerabilities

When it comes to security, enterprise systems and networks are not all created equal. When it comes down to it, they aren't all that different either. Some vulnerabilities are common to them all. Take our quiz to test your knowledge of various vulnerabilities and learn how to defend your organization against them with the resources we've collected below.

How to take the quiz:
- After reading the question, click on the answer that you think is correct to go to the whatis.com definition. If the answer you've chosen is correct, you will see the question text or an approximation of it somewhere in the definition.
OR
- After reading the question, write down the letter of your answer choice on scrap paper. Check your answers by using the answer key at the end of the quiz.

1. An intruder might install this on a networked computer to collect userids and passwords from other machines on the network.
a. passphrase
b. rootkit
c. ownership tag
d. token
e. Pseudonymous profile

2. This type of intrusion relies on the intruder's ability to trick people into breaking normal security procedures.
a. shoulder surfing
b. hijacking
c. brain fingerprinting
d. social engineering
e. war driving

3. The developers of an operating system or vendor application might issue this to prevent intruders from taking advantage of a weakness in their programming.
a. cookie
b. key fob
c. watermark
d. Antigen
e. patch

4. This is an attack on a computer system that takes advantage of a particular vulnerability that the system offers to intruders.
a. port scan
b. denial of service
c. exploit
d. logic bomb
e. phreaking

5. This is a program in which harmful code is contained inside apparently harmless programming or data.
a. Snort
b. honeypot
c. blue bomb
d. presence technology
e. Trojan horse

6. This is the modification of personal information on a Web user's computer to gain unauthorized information with which to obtain access to the user's existing accounts.
a. identity theft
b. cookie poisoning
c. shoulder surfing
d. relative identifier
e. piracy

7. This type of attack may cause additional damage by sending data containing codes designed to trigger specific actions - for example, changing data or disclosing confidential information.
a. buffer overflow
b. block cipher
c. war dialing
d. distributed denial-of-service attack
e. nuking

8. This is the forging of an e-mail header so that the message appears to have originated from someone or somewhere other than the actual source.
a. footprinting
b. nonrepudiation
c. e-mail spoofing
d. finger
e. sheep dipping

9. This is a type of network security attack in which the intruder takes control of a communication between two entities and masquerades as one of them.
a. hijacking
b. identity theft
c. Smurf attack
d. tunneling
e. stealth

10. This is a compromised Web site that is being used as an attack launch point in a denial-of-service attack.
a. bastion host
b. packet monkey
c. dongle
d. zombie
e. token

SCROLL DOWN FOR ANSWER KEY

















See the rest of our quiz topics

ANSWERS:

1. b. rootkit
Read expert advice on using a rootkit to test an intrusion-detection system.

2. d. social engineering
The Security Policies Tip, Social engineering attacks: What we can learn from Kevin Mitnick , offers best practicies for combating social engineering.

3. e. patch
Learn how to gain control over patches with this Tech Tip, Managing the patchwork mess .

4. c. exploit
Learn more about the threat of exploits in this article, Worm and exploit writers are faster than ever .

5. e. Trojan horse
This Virus Prevention Tip, Backdoor Trojan making the rounds , explains how to detect and remove the Backdoor.Spart.C Trojan.

6. b. cookie poisoning
Learn more about cookies in this Web Security Tip .

7. a. buffer overflow
Learn more about buffer overflows in this article, Buffer overflows likely to be around for another decade .

8. c. spoofing
SearchSecurity expert Jonathan Callas explains what measures businesses can take to protect themselves from e-mail spoofing in this Q&A.

9. a. hijacking
Learn more about session hijacking in this Ask the Expert Q&A with Stephen Mencik.

10. d. zombie
Don't become a zombie. Learn more about distributed denial-of-service attacks with the Security Policies Tip, Preparing for DDoS attacks .

This was last updated in August 2008
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