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DSC pull server

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

A DSC pull server (desired state configuration pull server) is an automation server that allows configurations to be maintained on many servers, computer workstations and devices across a network.

DSC pull servers use Microsoft Windows PowerShell DSC's declarative scripting to maintain current version software and also monitor and control the configuration of computers and services and the environment they run in. This capacity makes DSC pull servers very useful for administrators, allowing them to ensure reliability and interoperability between machines by stopping the configuration drift that can occur through making individual machine setting changes over time.

DSC pull servers use PowerShell or Windows Server 2012 and client servers must be running Windows Management Framework (WMF) 4. Microsoft has also developed PowerShell DSC for Linux.

Examples of how built-in DSC resources automation can configure and manage a set of computers or devices:

  •     Enabling or disabling server roles and features.
  •     Managing registry settings.
  •     Managing files and directories.
  •     Starting, stopping, and managing processes and services.
  •     Managing groups and user accounts.
  •     Deploying new software.
  •     Managing environment variables.
  •     Running Windows PowerShell scripts.
  •     Fixing configurations that drift away from the desired state.
  •     Discovering the actual configuration state on a given client.
This was last updated in August 2014

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Seems very useful. I wish to know if it can help me lessen my burden in continuous integration for my apps running in my managed Openstack cloud?
Also, improve your site for mobile devices. Thanks in advance.
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